Tom Shand

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Shand c. 1961 Tom Shand.jpg
Shand c. 1961

Thomas Philip (Tom) Shand (16 April 1911 – 11 December 1969) was a New Zealand politician of the National Party.

New Zealand National Party Major New Zealand political party

The New Zealand National Party, shortened to National or the Nats, is a centre-right political party in New Zealand. It is one of two major parties that dominate contemporary New Zealand politics, alongside its traditional rival, the New Zealand Labour Party.

Contents

Biography

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1946 1949 28th Marlborough National
1949 1951 29th Marlborough National
1951 1954 30th Marlborough National
1954 1957 31st Marlborough National
1957 1960 32nd Marlborough National
1960 1963 33rd Marlborough National
1963 1966 34th Marlborough National
1966 1969 35th Marlborough National
1969 36th Marlborough National

Shand was born in 1911 in Oamaru. He received his education at Christ's College, the University of Canterbury and the Canterbury Agricultural College. [1]

Oamaru Town in Otago, New Zealand

Oamaru is the largest town in North Otago, in the South Island of New Zealand, it is the main town in the Waitaki District. It is 80 kilometres (50 mi) south of Timaru and 120 kilometres (75 mi) north of Dunedin on the Pacific coast; State Highway 1 and the railway Main South Line connect it to both cities. With a population of 13,950, Oamaru is the 28th largest urban area in New Zealand, and the third largest in Otago behind Dunedin and Queenstown.

Christs College, Christchurch independent, Anglican, secondary, day and boarding school for boys, located in the central city of Christchurch, New Zealand

Christ's College, Christchurch is an independent, Anglican, secondary, day and boarding school for boys, located in the city centre of Christchurch, New Zealand.

University of Canterbury university in Christchurch, New Zealand

The University of Canterbury is New Zealand's second oldest university.

On 8 February 1937 he married the medical doctor Claudia Lillian Weston. Her father, Claude Weston, was the first president of the National Party. [2]

Claude Weston New Zealand lawyer

Claude Horace Weston was a New Zealand lawyer, a lieutenant-colonel in World War I, and effectively the first president of the National Party (1936–1940).

He first stood for Parliament in 1943 against the incumbent Labour representative in the Marlborough electorate, Edwin Meachen, and was unsuccessful. [1] At the next election in 1946, he was successful and held the Marlborough electorate until 1969, when he died. [3]

1943 New Zealand general election

The 1943 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 27th term. With the onset of World War II, elections were initially postponed, but it was eventually decided to hold a general election in September 1943, around two years after it would normally have occurred. The election saw the governing Labour Party re-elected by a comfortable margin, although the party nevertheless lost considerable ground to the expanding National Party.

Marlborough is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate, in the Marlborough region at the top of the South Island. It existed from 1938 to 1996, and was represented by five Members of Parliament.

Edwin Meachen New Zealand politician

Edwin Purcell Meachen was a New Zealand politician of the Labour Party.

He was a cabinet minister; Postmaster-General (1954–1957), Minister of Labour (1960–1969), Minister of Immigration (1960–1969), and Minister of Mines (1960–1969), and Minister of Electricity (1963–1969). [4]

Minister of Labour (New Zealand)

The Minister of Labour was the minister in the government responsible for the Department of Labour. The portfolio was established in 1892, a year after the Department of Labour was formed, and was abolished on 1 July 2012, when it was replaced by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. Today, the duties of the Minister of Labour are assumed by the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety.

Shand died as a result of lung cancer on 11 December 1969, [1] [2] just twelve days after being re-elected in that year's general election.

1969 New Zealand general election

The 1969 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of Parliament's 36th term. It saw the Second National Government headed by Prime Minister Keith Holyoake of the National Party win a fourth consecutive term.

In the 1970 by-election to replace him, his son Anthony Shand stood as the National candidate to replace him, but was defeated in the greatest swing against a government since the 1935 general election.[ citation needed ]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Gustafson 1986, p. 341.
  2. 1 2 Templeton, Hugh. "Shand, Thomas Philip". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 27 March 2014.
  3. Wilson 1985, p. 233.
  4. Wilson 1985, pp. 87, 89.

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References

Political offices
Preceded by
Walter Broadfoot
Postmaster-General
and Minister of Telegraphs

1954–1957
Succeeded by
Michael Moohan
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
Edwin Meachen
Member of Parliament for Marlborough
19461969
Succeeded by
Ian Brooks