Tom Walkinshaw

Last updated

Tom Walkinshaw
Tom Walkinshaw.jpg
NationalityScottish
Born(1946-08-14)14 August 1946
Mauldslie, Scotland
Died12 December 2010(2010-12-12) (aged 64)
TeamsMG Midget,
Team Lotus,
Tom Walkinshaw Racing
Championship titles
Scottish FF1600,
European Touring Car Championship

Tom Walkinshaw (14 August 1946 – 12 December 2010) [1] was a British racing car driver and the founder of the racing team Tom Walkinshaw Racing (TWR). He was also involved in professional rugby union, as owner of Gloucester Rugby, and chairman of the team owners organisation for the Aviva Premiership. [2]

Auto racing motorsport involving the racing of cars for competition

Auto racing is a motorsport involving the racing of automobiles for competition.

Tom Walkinshaw Racing (TWR) was a motor racing team and engineering firm founded in 1976, in Kidlington, near Oxford, England by touring car racer Tom Walkinshaw.

Rugby union Team sport, code of rugby football

Rugby union, commonly known in most of the world simply as rugby, is a contact team sport which originated in England in the first half of the 19th century. One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand. In its most common form, a game is between two teams of 15 players using an oval-shaped ball on a rectangular field with H-shaped goalposts at each end.

Contents

Racing career

The Rover SD1 of Tom Walkinshaw and Win Percy at the Nurburgring in 1985. Rover Vitesse 19850706.jpg
The Rover SD1 of Tom Walkinshaw and Win Percy at the Nürburgring in 1985.

Walkinshaw was born at Mauldslie Farm, near Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland. He began racing in 1968, starting in an MG Midget, before moving on to a Lotus Formula Ford car. The following year he won the Scottish FF1600 title at the wheel of a Hawke. In 1970, he entered the British Formula Three championship with Lotus. He later moved to the March 'works' team, where he broke his ankle in a racing accident. [3] Continuing his career despite this setback, he drove in many classes, including Formula 5000 and Formula Two. [4]

Penicuik town and former burgh in Midlothian, Scotland

Penicuik is a town and former burgh in Midlothian, Scotland, lying on the west bank of the River North Esk. It lies on the A701 midway between Edinburgh and Peebles, east of the Pentland Hills.

MG Midget car model

The MG Midget is a small two-seater sports car produced by MG from 1961 to 1979. It revived a name that had been used on earlier models such as the MG M-type, MG D-type, MG J-type and MG T-type.

Team Lotus was the motorsport sister company of English sports car manufacturer Lotus Cars. The team ran cars in many motorsport series, including Formula One, Formula Two, Formula Ford, Formula Junior, IndyCar, and sports car racing. More than ten years after its last race, Team Lotus remained one of the most successful racing teams of all time, winning seven Formula One Constructors' titles, six Drivers' Championships, and the Indianapolis 500 in the United States between 1962 and 1978. Under the direction of founder and chief designer Colin Chapman, Lotus was responsible for many innovative and experimental developments in critical motorsport, in both technical and commercial arenas.

Ford hired Walkinshaw to drive a Capri on the British Touring Car Championship circuit in 1974. This resulted in him winning his class that year. In 1976 Walkinshaw established Tom Walkinshaw Racing (TWR), continuing to drive for his own team. In 1984 he won the European Touring Car Championship in a 5.3-litre, V12 Jaguar XJS. [5]

Ford Motor Company American automobile manufacturer

Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker that has its main headquarter in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and most luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom and a 32% stake in Jiangling Motors. It also has joint-ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and Russia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.

Ford Capri fastback coupé manufactured by Ford Motor Company

The Ford Capri is a fastback coupé built by Ford Motor Company between 1968 and 1986, designed by American Philip T. Clark, who was also involved in the design of the Ford Mustang. It used the mechanical components from the Mk2 Ford Cortina and was intended as the European equivalent of the Ford Mustang. The Capri went on to be a highly successful car for Ford, selling nearly 1.9 million units in its lifetime. A wide variety of engines was used in the Capri throughout its production lifespan, which included the Essex and Cologne V6 at the top of the range, whilst the Kent straight-four and Taunus V4 engines were used in lower specification models. Although the Capri was not officially replaced, the second-generation Probe was effectively its replacement after the later car's introduction to the European market in 1992.

British Touring Car Championship auto racing championship in the United Kingdom

The British Touring Car Championship is a touring car racing series held each year in the United Kingdom, currently organised and administered by TOCA. It was established in 1958 as the British Saloon Car Championship and was renamed as the British Touring Car Championship for the 1987 season. The championship, currently running Next Generation Touring Car regulations, has been run to various national and international regulations over the years including FIA Group 2, FIA Group 5, FIA Group 1, FIA Group A, FIA Super Touring and FIA Super 2000. A lower-key Group N class for production cars ran from 2000 until 2003.

In September 1984, Walkinshaw had teamed up with Australian driver John Goss to drive an Australian Group C spec XJS in the Bathurst 1000. After qualifying the big cat in 10th spot, Walkinshaw never left the starting line after transmission failure and was hit from behind by a Chevrolet Camaro. Several cars also joined the crash causing the race to be red flagged and restarted 30 minutes later (the first restart in the race's history).

John GossOAM is an Australian retired motor racing driver who competed in his home country during the 1960s, 1970's and 1980's. He is the only driver to have won Australia's two most prestigious races, the Bathurst 1000, and the Australian Grand Prix (1976).

Group C (Australia)

In relation to Australian motorsport, Group C refers to either of two sets of regulations devised by the Confederation of Australian Motor Sport (CAMS) for use in Australian Touring Car Racing from 1965 to 1984. These are not to be confused with the FIA’s Group C sports car regulations, used from 1982 to 1992 for the World Endurance Championship / World Sports-Prototype Championship / World Sportscar Championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

1984 James Hardie 1000

The 1984 James Hardie 1000 was the 25th running of the Bathurst 1000 touring car race. It was held on 30 September 1984 at the Mount Panorama Circuit just outside Bathurst in New South Wales, Australia and was Round 4 of the 1984 Australian Endurance Championship. This race was celebrated as 'The Last of the Big Bangers', in reference to the Group C touring cars, which were competing at Bathurst for the last time.

In 1985, Jaguar retired the XJS from Group A racing and TWR was forced to use the cars they'd been racing in the British Touring Car Championship, the 3.5-litre V8 Rover Vitesse in the European Touring Car Championship. Walkinshaw and Percy won 6 of the 14 races in the championship but could only finish the championship 3rd behind the Eggenberger Volvo 240T's of Gianfranco Brancatelli and Thomas Lindström.

Rover SD1 executive car

The Rover SD1 is both the code name and eventual production name given to a series of executive cars built by the Specialist Division of British Leyland (BL), under the Rover marque. It was produced through its Specialist, Rover Triumph and Austin Rover divisions from 1976 until 1986, when it was replaced by the Rover 800. The SD1 was marketed under various names. In 1977 it won the European Car of the Year title.

The European Touring Car Championship was an international touring car racing series organised by the FIA. It had two incarnations, the first one between 1963 and 1988, and the second between 2000 and 2004. In 2005 it was superseded by the World Touring Car Championship, and replaced by the European Touring Car Cup between 2005 and 2017 when became also defunct.

Eggenberger Motorsport was a Swiss motor racing team that competed in the European Touring Car Championship in the 1980s.

With Australia's move to Group A in 1985, Walkinshaw vowed to return to Bathurst with his ETCC Jaguars in a bid to win the Australian classic. The three ETCC Jags were brought out of retirement and shipped to Bathurst with the help of "Jaguar Rover Australia" (JRA) and proceeded to dominate practice and qualifying, with Walkinshaw claiming pole position, Jeff Allam claiming second spot on the grid and provisional pole sitter John Goss starting 6th. Driving with regular ETCC co-driver Win Percy, Walkinshaw finished 3rd in the race after leading for over ⅔ distance following a split oil line late in the race. The Allam/Ron Dickson car was out after 3 laps with engine failure when broken glass from the cars right headlight got sucked into the intake system, while the Goss/Armin Hahne car would win for TWR after having to battle for over 100 laps of the 6.172 km (3.835 mi) long Mount Panorama Circuit with a broken drivers seat which had to be held in place by cable ties attached to the roll cage.

Jeff Allam, is a former British racing driver who made his name in Saloon Car racing. He now works as Head of Business for Allam Motor Services in Epsom which are a Skoda sales and service and Vauxhall servicing dealership. Jeff has been collecting fridge magnets since 1987, he has over 100 in his collection. Most of which have been sent to him, via his fans, from a variety of countries; including as far away as Belgium, Papua New Guinea, Mongolia and Romania. His ambition is to have one from each country of the world. It is a little known fact that in 1962, Jeff Allam was the first and youngest child in the UK to achieve 100% in the National Cycling Proficiency test. Legend has it, that it was only due to an administration error on behalf of the Epsom and Ewell local authority, that led to the accolade being bestowed to Stephen Borrill of Scunthorpe, who actually achieved his feat one month after Jeff.

Win Percy British racing driver

Winston "Win" Percy is a former motor racing driver from England. Percy was British Touring Car Champion three times, and at the time of his retirement was the most successful non-Antipodean driver ever to compete in Australia's premier national motorsport event, the Bathurst 1000km. Joe Saward of Autosport magazine said he was "often regarded as the World's Number One Touring Car Driver".

Armin Hahne is a German racing driver, best known for his exploits in touring car racing. The highpoint of his career was winning both the 1982 and 1983 Spa 24 Hours driving BMW's. Another highlight of his career was driving in the factory supported Tom Walkinshaw Racing run Jaguar Racing team racing the Jaguar XJS coupes. Hahne stayed with the team as they transitioned to Rover Vitesse. In 1991 he drove for one race in the British Touring Car Championship for BMW.

The Rovers, with sponsorship from Bastos/Texaco, were again the TWR cars for the renamed ETCC (which had become the FIATCC in 1986 in anticipation of the 1987 World Touring Car Championship). Walkinshaw was again a favourite to take out the title, but once again would finish 3rd. Co-driver Win Percy was originally announced as the 1986 champion before results from earlier races were amended following protest hearings. Walkinshaw had intended to return to Bathurst in 1986 with the V12 Jaguars but withdrew when JRA refused to help with funds following a downturn in the Australian car market.

With sponsorship from the NZ based Strathmore Group, Walkinshaw took the Jaguars to Japan and New Zealand for the 1986 Fuji InterTEC 500 and the XJS' final race, the 1987 Wellington 500. After some engine work which lifted the V12's power output to 500 bhp (373 kW; 507 PS), Walkinshaw proved that the 1984 spec Jags were still competitive in 1986 by qualifying on pole at the fast Fuji circuit in front of the new Nissan Skyline RS DR30s and Holden VK Commodore SS Group As. Walkinshaw comfortably led the race for the first 6 laps from team mate Jeff Allam and Australian Peter Brock in his Holden Dealer Team VK Commodore before retiring with no oil pressure.

After entering into a partnership with Australian car manufacturer Holden in February 1987 (at the expense of Brock's HDT Special Vehicles operation), Walkinshaw fully intended to compete in the inaugural World Touring Car Championship driving a 4.9-litre V8 Holden VL Commodore SS Group A, but withdrew before the first race at Monza in protest at the US$60,000 entrance fee imposed by Bernie Ecclestone who had put in charge of the WTCC by the FIA. Walkinshaw and Jeff Allam appeared with the car at the Nürburgring round of the championship but the car was uncompetitive against the new Ford Sierra RS Cosworths and BMW M3s and retired with brake problems.

In 1988 TWR developed the Holden VL Commodore SS Group A SV and Walkinshaw again teamed with Jeff Allam at the RAC Tourist Trophy at Silverstone. Although still not a match for the Ford Sierra RS500s, Walkinshaw qualified the Commodore in 9th place. The pair finished the race in 15th place following various problems with the car.

Tom Walkinshaw's last race as a driver was the 1988 Tooheys 1000 at Bathurst. In partnership with Australian Larry Perkins, TWR shipped the ETCC Commodore to Australia for the race as part of the Holden Special Vehicles team. Following a messy lead up to the race, which included Walkinshaw illegally protesting the five leading Australian built Sierras, Walkinshaw and Allam qualified in 13th place (slower than the Perkins Engineering built team car), and was the second retirement after just 5 laps with rear suspension failure. Walkinshaw himself was cross-entered in the Perkins/Denny Hulme car and drove the car later in the race. The car was retired with engine failure after 137 laps while in 2nd place. Walkinshaw's protest against the Sierras was later found to be illegal because Perkins Engineering was the entrant for the HSV team and not TWR. The stewards of the meeting had erred in letting Walkinshaw lodge the protest under TWR's FIA licence as only a race entrant was entitled to lodge protests under the rules of the meeting. In an ironic twist to Walkinshaw's last race meeting as a driver, the three HSV team cars, including the team's spare car, were found to have illegal modifications to the steering racks after a counter-protest by Dick Johnson Racing team manager Neal Lowe, though no action was taken as the spare car didn't start the race and both race cars failed to finish.

Following the Tooheys 1000, Walkinshaw retired from driving to concentrate on the management of TWR's increasing motorsports portfolio.

Team management

Walkinshaw (left) with Flavio Briatore at the 1993 British Grand Prix Walkinshaw Briatore British GP 1993.jpg
Walkinshaw (left) with Flavio Briatore at the 1993 British Grand Prix

In 1975 Walkinshaw established Tom Walkinshaw Racing (TWR), a group whose business was the manufacture and design of racing and road cars. TWR ran touring car programmes in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. In 1983 the TWR team took an amazing eleven wins in eleven races in the British Saloon Car Championship running Rover Vitesses, before being stripped of the title for a technical infringement. TWR also ran a Jaguar XJ-S ETCC touring car programme before taking on their World Sportscar Championship programme. In six years the programme won Le Mans twice and the World Championships three times. The same team brought engineer Ross Brawn to prominence. [6]

In 1991 Walkinshaw was recruited as Engineering Director of the Benetton F1 team which subsequently won the 1995 Formula One World Championship. He was involved in the recruitment of Michael Schumacher by Benetton after the German's Formula One debut with the Jordan team. As Engineering Director, his role also came under scrutiny when the team was investigated for suspected technical infringements during the 1994 season, including the potential use of banned electronic aids and unauthorised modifications to the refuelling apparatus used on the cars. Although illegal software was found in the Benettons, the FIA had no evidence that it had ever been used in a race and no action was taken against the team.

For 1995 Walkinshaw bought 50% of the Ligier team from Benetton team principal Flavio Briatore. His intention was to take over the team completely, but he was unable to purchase 100% of the team and therefore pulled out of the deal. Instead he bought the Arrows team, achieving a coup for the 1997 Formula One season by recruiting reigning world champion Damon Hill to his squad.

In 1997 Walkinshaw was voted Autocar Man of the Year. By this stage the TWR Group employed 1500 employees in the UK, Sweden, Australia and the United States. At the time, Walkinshaw was also managing director of Arrows Grand Prix International.

His TWR racing group went into liquidation in 2002 after the Arrows team ran out of money. This led to the Australian arm of the operation being bought by Holden. However, since the regulations for the V8 Supercar Championship Series forbid a manufacturer owning a race team, Holden had to divest the teams assets and sell the Holden Racing Team to lead driver Mark Skaife, and K-Mart Racing (later HSV Dealer Team) to John and Margaret Kelly (the parents of V8 Supercar drivers Todd and Rick).

In 2005 Tom Walkinshaw returned to the V8 Supercars Australia and began a new relationship with his former teams, HSV Dealer Team and Holden Racing Team, helping lead Holden to its first series win since 2002 through driver Rick Kelly (2006) and Garth Tander (2007). In late 2006 Walkinshaw Performance bought the small Australian sports car manufacturer Elfin Cars. In 2007 Walkinshaw Performance acquired a 50% stake in the Holden Racing Team, and in 2008 fully re-acquired the team from Skaife Sports. 2009 saw the debut of Walkinshaw Racing a two car operation known individually as Bundaberg Red Racing and Team Autobarn.

Death

Walkinshaw died on Sunday 12 December 2010, aged 64, from complications arising from cancer. [2] [7] He is survived by his first wife Elizabeth Walkinshaw and their son Fergus Walkinshaw, and his second wife Martine Walkinshaw and their sons Ryan and Sean. Walkinshaw's memorial service was held at Gloucester Cathedral on 4 February 2011.

Career summary

Results sourced from Driver Database and History of Touring Car Racing. [8] [9]

SeasonSeriesPositionCarTeam
1970 Shell Super Oil British F3 Championship 26th March 713M Ford
1971Rothmans International Trophy9th March 712M Cosworth Ecurie Ecosse
1971 European Formula Two Championship NCMarch 712M CosworthEcurie Ecosse
1973 European Touring Car Championship Div.2NC Datsun Sunny Coupé GX Datsun UK Ltd.
1973BP British Formula Atlantic Series21stGRD 273 Ford BDA Myson Racing Team
1973Yellow Pages British Formula Atlantic Championship21stGRD 273 Ford BDAMyson Racing Team
1974John Player British Formula Atlantic Series16thModus M3 Ford BDA
1974 British Saloon Car Championship 4th Ford Capri 3000 GT Shellsport
1975 European Formula 5000 Championship 20thModus M5 Ford
March 752 Ford
ShellSPORT Team Modus
1976 British Saloon Car Championship5th Ford Capri 3000 Team Castrol
1979 British Saloon Car Championship2nd Mazda RX-7 Tom Walkinshaw Racing
1981 World Sportscar Championship 39thMazda RX-7Tom Walkinshaw Racing
Mazdaspeed
1982 World Sportscar Championship70th Mazda RX-7 254i Mazdaspeed
1982European Touring Car Championship3rd Jaguar XJS Tom Walkinshaw Racing
1983European Touring Car Championship2ndJaguar XJSTom Walkinshaw Racing
1984European Touring Car Championship1stJaguar XJSTom Walkinshaw Racing
1984 Australian Endurance Championship NCJaguar XJS John Goss Racing
1985Nissan Sport 500 Series3rd Rover Vitesse Tom Walkinshaw Racing
1985European Touring Car Championship3rdRover VitesseTom Walkinshaw Racing
1985 Australian Endurance Championship23rdJaguar XJSTom Walkinshaw Racing
1986Nissan Mobil 500 Series6thRover VitesseTom Walkinshaw Racing
1986 European Touring Car Championship3rdRover VitesseTom Walkinshaw Racing
1987 World Touring Car Championship NC Holden VL Commodore SS Group A Tom Walkinshaw Racing
1988European Touring Car ChampionshipNC Holden VL Commodore SS Group A SV Tom Walkinshaw Racing
1988 Asia-Pacific Touring Car Championship NCHolden VL Commodore SS Group A SV Holden Special Vehicles

Complete World Sportscar Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearTeamCar12345678910111213141516DCPoints
1980 Flag of the United States.svg JLC Racing Mazda RX-7 DAY
DNS
BRA SEB MUG MNZ RIV SIL NUR LMS DAY WAT SPA MOS VAL RAM DIJ NC0
1981 Flag of Japan.svg Mazdaspeed Co. Ltd. Mazda RX-7 DAY SEB MUG MNZ RIV SIL
DNS
NUR LMS
Ret
PUR DAY WAT 39th41
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing SPA
1
MOS RAM BRA
1982 Flag of Japan.svg Mazdaspeed Co. Ltd. Mazda RX-7 254i MNZ SIL
Ret
NUR
DNA
LMS
Ret
SPA MUG FJI
6
BRA 70th6

Complete European Touring Car Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearTeamCar1234567891011121314DCPoints
1973 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Datsun UK Ltd Datsun Sunny Coupé GX MNZ SAL MAN NUR SPA ZAN PAU SIL
9
NCNA
1982 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Jaguar XJS MNZ
Ret
VAL
3
DON
Ret
PER MUG
Ret
BRN
1
SAL
2
NUR
1
SPA
Ret
SIL
1
ZOL 3rd107
1983 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Jaguar XJS MNZ
2
VAL
3
DON
5
PER
1
MUG
3
BRN
1
ZEL
1
NUR
Ret
SAL
1
SPA
Ret
SIL
9
ZOL
8
2nd168
1984 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Jaguar XJS MNZ
1
VAL
3
DON
9
PER
2
BRN
1
ZEL
1
SAL
Ret
NUR
5
SPA
1
SIL
Ret
ZOL
3
MUG
Ret
1st181
1985 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Rover Vitesse MNZ
1
VAL
1
DON
1
AND
Ret
BRN
8
ZEL
Ret
SAL
2
NUR
Ret
SPA
Ret
SIL
1
NOG
1
ZOL
Ret
EST
Ret
JAR
1
3rd198
1986 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Rover Vitesse MNZ
1
DON
1
HOC
4
MIS
3
AND
2
BRN
2
ZEL
Ret
NUR
4
SPA
Ret
SIL
3
NOG
16
ZOL
3
JAR
2
EST
2
3rd190
1988 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Holden VL Commodore SS Group A SV MNZ DON EST JAR DIJ VAL NUR SPA ZOL SIL
15
NOG NCNA

Complete World Touring Car Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearTeamCar1234567891011DCPoints
1987 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Holden VL Commodore SS Group A MNZ JAR DIJ NUR
Ret
SPA BNO SIL BAT CLD WEL FJI NC0

Not eligible for series points

Complete Asia-Pacific Touring Car Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

YearTeamCar1234DCPoints
1988 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Holden Special Vehicles Holden VL Commodore SS Group A SV BAT
Ret
WEL PUK FJI NC0

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1976 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Hermetite Productions Ltd. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg John Fitzpatrick BMW 3.5CSL Gr.517DNFDNF
1977 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Luigi Racing Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Eddy Joosen
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Claude de Wael
BMW 3.0 CSL IMSA45DNFDNF
1981 Flag of Japan.svg Mazdaspeed Co. Ltd. Flag of Japan.svg Tetsu Ikuzawa
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Peter Lovett
Mazda RX-7 IMSA GTO107DNFDNF
1982 Flag of Japan.svg Mazdaspeed Co. Ltd. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Chuck Nicholson
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Peter Lovett
Mazda RX-7 IMSA GTX180DNFDNF

Complete Spa 24 Hour results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1974 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ford UK/Hermetite Flag of the United Kingdom.svg John Fitzpatrick Ford Capri II 3.0 Div. 4NADNFDNF
1975 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Hermetite Products Flag of the United Kingdom.svg John Fitzpatrick Ford Capri II 3.0 Div. 4NADNFDNF
1977 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Luigi BMW Racing with Castrol Flag of Italy.svg Umberto Grano BMW 530i US +2500NADNFDNF
1979 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Valvoline Racing Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Jacques Goujon Ford Capri III 3.0S +2500NADNFDNF
1981 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Pierre Dieudonné Mazda RX-7 −25004561st1st
1982 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Chuck Nicholson
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Win Percy
Jaguar XJS Div. 39th hourDNFDNF
1983 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Pierre Dieudonné Jaguar XJS Div. 311th hourDNFDNF
1984 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Win Percy
Flag of Germany.svg Hans Heyer
Jaguar XJS Div. 34531st1st
1985 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Eddy Joosen
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Martin Brundle
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Marc Duez
Rover Vitesse Div. 3366DNFDNF
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Win Percy
Flag of Germany.svg Hans Heyer
Rover Vitesse Div. 386DNFDNF
1986 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Tom Walkinshaw Racing Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Win Percy
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Eddy Joosen
Rover Vitesse Div. 3383DNFDNF

Complete Bathurst 1000 results

YearTeamCo-DriversCarClassLapsPos.Class
Pos.
1984 Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Goss Racing Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Goss Jaguar XJS Group C0DNFDNF
1985 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg JRA Ltd Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Win Percy Jaguar XJS C1603rd3rd
1988 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Holden Special Vehicles Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Jeff Allam Holden VL Commodore SS Group A SV A5DNFDNF
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Larry Perkins
Flag of New Zealand.svg Denny Hulme
Holden VL Commodore SS Group A SV A137DNFDNF

Notes

  1. Henry, Alan (13 December 2010). "Tom Walkinshaw obituary". The Guardian. London.
  2. 1 2 "Gloucester mourn owner Tom Walkinshaw". BBC News. 12 December 2010. Retrieved 12 December 2010.
  3. Grand Prix Encyclopedia www.grandprix.com Retrieved 13 December 2006
  4. Collings (2004) p. 211
  5. Collings (2004) pp.211–212
  6. Autocar.co.uk Retrieved 13 December 2010
  7. "Tom Walkinshaw Passes Away". Autosport. 12 December 2010. Retrieved 12 December 2010.
  8. Tom Walkinshaw – Driver Database
  9. History of Touring Car Racing

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The 1985 James Hardie 1000 was the 26th running of the Bathurst 1000 touring car race. It was held on 6 October 1985 at the Mount Panorama Circuit just outside Bathurst. It was the first time the race was held exclusively for cars complying with the Australian version of International Group A touring car regulations. The event was Round Four of both the 1985 Australian Endurance Championship and the 1985 Australian Manufacturers' Championship.

John Francis Harvey is a retired Australian racing driver. He was a top Speedcar driver for many years in the 1950s and 1960s, winning many championship races including the NSW Championship for three successive years and the Victorian Championship twice before turning his skills to road racing where he had a long and successful career until his retirement at the end of 1988.

Roadways Racing was an Australian motor racing team that competed in Australian Touring Car racing in the 1980s. It also competed in the 1986 European Touring Car Championship.

References

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Jean-Michel Martin
Philippe Martin
Winner of the Spa 24 Hours
1981
(with Pierre Dieudonné)
Succeeded by
Armin Hahne
Hans Heyer
Eddy Joosen
Preceded by
Dieter Quester
European Touring Car Champion
1984
Succeeded by
Gianfranco Brancatelli
Thomas Lindström
Preceded by
Thierry Tassin
Hans Heyer
Armin Hahne
Winner of the Spa 24 Hours
1984
(with Hans Heyer & Win Percy)
Succeeded by
Roberto Ravaglia
Gerhard Berger
Marc Surer
Preceded by
Hans-Joachim Stuck
Guia Race winner
1984
Succeeded by
Gianfranco Brancatelli