Tom Walsh (rugby league, Castleford)

Last updated
Tom Walsh
Personal information
Bornunknown
Diedunknown
Playing information
Position Scrum-half
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1933/34–34/35 Leigh 6716430134
1936–55 Castleford 11226205128
≤1944–≥44Dewsbury (guest)≥1
Total42635262

Tom Walsh (birth unknown – death unknown), also known by the nickname of "Tot", was a professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. He played at club level for Leigh (Heritage № 383), [1] [2] Castleford, and Dewsbury (World War II guest), as a goal-kicking scrum-half, i.e. number 7. [3] [4] [5]

Nickname informal name of a person, place, or thing, for affection or ridicule

A nickname is a substitute for the proper name of a familiar person, place, or thing - commonly used for affection.

Rugby league team sport, code of rugby football

Rugby league football is a full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field. One of the two codes of rugby, it originated in Northern England in 1895 as a split from the Rugby Football Union over the issue of payments to players. Its rules progressively changed with the aim of producing a faster, more entertaining game for spectators.

Leigh Centurions

The Leigh Centurions are a professional rugby league club in Leigh, Greater Manchester, England, who compete in the Championship.

Contents

Playing career

Championship Final appearances

Tom Walsh played scrum-half in Dewsbury's 14-25 aggregate defeat by Wigan in the Championship Final during the 1943–44 season; Walsh played scrum-half, and scored a try, and 3-goals (1-goal, and 2-penalty goals) in the 9-13 first-leg defeat at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 13 May 1944, but Harry Royal played scrum-half in the 5-12 second-leg defeat at Crown Flatt, Dewsbury on Saturday 20 May 1944. [6]

Dewsbury Rams English rugby league club

The Dewsbury Rams are a professional English rugby league club based in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire which competes in the Kingstone Press Championship. They play their home games at the Tetley's Stadium, on Owl Lane. The Rams main fanbase comes from their hometown of Dewsbury but also hold a strong following in Shaw Cross as well as neighbouring Gawthorpe and Ossett, amongst other places. Prior to the 1997 season, the club was known simply as Dewsbury R.L.F.C.

Wigan Warriors English rugby league club

The Wigan Warriors are a professional rugby league club in Wigan, England, who compete in the Super League, and are the current/defending Champions.

The 1943–44 Northern Rugby Football Union season was the fifth season of the rugby league’s 'Wartime Emergency League necessitated by the Second World War.
As in the previous (fourth) Wartime season, the clubs each played a different number of games, but this season clubs re-joined the league and there were now 16 of the original clubs taking part in the Competition.
The League remained as one single amalgamated Championship.

County League appearances

Tom Walsh played in Castleford's victory in the Yorkshire County League during the 1938–39 season.

Castleford Tigers english professional rugby league football club

The Castleford Tigers are a rugby league club in Castleford, West Yorkshire, England, that compete in the Super League, the top-level professional rugby league club competition in the Northern Hemisphere. The club have competed in the top division for the majority of their existence having only been relegated twice in their history, Castleford has won the Challenge Cup four times. Their most recent major trophy was the 2017 Super League League Leaders Shield. Castleford have a rivalry with neighbours Featherstone Rovers and Wakefield Trinity. The club has been based at Wheldon Road since 1927, after moving from the Sandy Desert in Lock Lane. The club's current home colours are black and amber.

The Yorkshire League and the Lancashire League formed two sections of the Rugby Football League Championship for much of its history. Initially, the 22 clubs that broke away in 1895 played in one combined league; however, the following season saw the addition of many clubs, and the League was split into two separate county competitions.

The 1938–39 Rugby Football League season was the 44th season of rugby league football.

Related Research Articles

Antony "Tony" Smith, also known by the nickname "Casper", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, and coached in the 2000s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford Tigers, Wigan Warriors and Hull FC, as a stand-off, scrum-half or hooker, i.e. number 6, 7, or 9, and coached at club level for Wakefield Trinity Wildcats.

Lee Mitchell English rugby league player

Lee Mitchell, also known by the nicknames of "Mitch", and "Shaggy", is an English rugby league footballer who plays as a second-row for the Rochdale Hornets in the Betfred Championship.

Harry Street was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford, St. Helens, Dewsbury, Wigan, Leeds and Featherstone Rovers, as a centre or loose forward, i.e. number 3 or 4, or 13, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for Castleford and Bradford Northern,

Kevin Ashcroft is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Lancashire, and at club level for the Rochdale Hornets, Dewsbury, Leigh, Warrington and Salford, as a prop or hooker, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 9, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for Leigh and Salford. Ashcroft is a Warrington Hall of Fame inductee.

Keith Hepworth, also known by the nickname of 'Heppy', is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, Yorkshire and Commonwealth XIII, and at club level for Castleford, Leeds and Hull FC, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached at club level for Bramley and Hull FC.

Arthur Evans, also known by the nickname of "Candy", was a Welsh boxer, dual-code international rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales, and at club level for Pontypool RFC, as a lock, i.e. number 4 or 5, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, Glamorgan County RLFC, and at club level for Halifax, Leeds, Castleford, Warrington, and Leigh, as a hooker, or second-row, i.e. number 9, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

Thomas "Tommy" Bradshaw was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan, Leigh and Workington Town, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7.

Laurie Gilfedder British rugby league player

Lawrence "Laurie"/"Gilly" M. Gilfedder was an English rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Warrington RUFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Lancashire, and at club level for Warrington, Wigan, and Leigh, as a goal-kicking centre, second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 3 or 4, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Tony Marchant is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford, Wynnum Manly Seagulls, Bradford Northern and Dewsbury, as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4.

Gary Stephens is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford, Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles, Wigan, Warrington (loan), Leigh, Halifax and York, as a wing, or scrum-half, i.e. number 2 or 5, or 7, and coached at club level for Ryedale-York.

Joseph Walsh was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Leigh, and Warrington, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5.

Thomas Harry Royal was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, and rugby league coach of the 1940s and 1950s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Welsh Schoolboys, and Glamorgan County RFC, and at club level for Blaengarw RFC, and Bridgend RFC, and he played representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Huddersfield, Dewsbury (captain), and Batley (captain), as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached club level rugby league (RL) for Batley.

Ernest Gwyn Richards was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales, and at club level for Bryncethin RFC, Bridgend RFC, Cardiff RFC and Torquay Athletic RFC, as a fly-half, i.e. number 10, and club level rugby league (RL) for Huddersfield, and Leigh, as a stand-off, i.e. number 6.

Edward Sadler was an English dual-code international rugby union and rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s and 1940s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for England, and whilst serving with the Royal Corps of Signals for the Army Rugby Union, and representative level rugby league (RL) for England, and at club level for Oldham and Castleford. He also appeared for Wigan as a World War II guest player.

Robert "Bob" Beardmore is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played at club level for Castleford and Leigh, as a goal-kicking scrum-half, i.e. number 7.

Frank Smith was a professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s and 1940s. He played at representative level for Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford and Dewsbury, as a second-row, i.e. number 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

Philip Johnson is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford, Featherstone Rovers, and Leigh, as a goal-kicking fullback, centre, or stand-off, i.e. number 1, 3 or 4, or 6.

John George Langfield was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford (captain), St. Helens, Hull FC and Bramley, as a goal-kicking scrum-half, and occasional fullback.

Tony Miller is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at club level for Castleford, as a hooker, i.e. number 9, during the era of contested scrums.

Alan Shillito is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s. He played at club level for Halifax, and Castleford, as a prop, or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

References

  1. "They Played For Leigh (Statistics) at leighrl.co.uk". leighrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "Heritage Numbers at leighrl.co.uk". leighrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. David Smart & Andrew Howard (1 July 2000). "Images of Sport - Castleford Rugby League - A Twentieth Century History". The History Press Ltd. ISBN   978-0752418957
  4. "Castleford RLFC A to Z Player List (All Time)". thecastlefordtigers.co.uk ℅ web.archive.org. 31 December 2014. Archived from the original on February 16, 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2015.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  5. "Statistics at thecastlefordtigers.co.uk". thecastlefordtigers.co.uk ℅ web.archive.org. 31 December 2014. Archived from the original on July 22, 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2012.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  6. "1943–1944 War Emergency League Championship Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.