Tom York

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Tom York may refer to:

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1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1964th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 964th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1960s decade.

Nick is a masculine given name. It is also often encountered as a short form (hypocorism) of the given names Nicholas, Nicola, Nicolas or Nikola. It may refer to:

Thomas, Tom, or Tommy Sullivan may refer to:

Neal (Neil) is a masculine given name, and surname of Gaelic origin. The name is an Anglicisation of the Irish Niall which is of disputed derivation. The Irish name may be derived from words meaning "cloud", "passionate", or "champion". As a surname, Neil is traced back to Niall of the Nine Hostages who was an Irish king and eponymous ancestor of the Uí Néill and MacNeil kindred. Most authorities cite the meaning of Neal in the context of a surname as meaning champion.

York and Yorke are surnames and may refer to:

Courtney is a name of Old French origin, introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. It has two quite distinct interpretations: firstly, the surname may be locational, from places called Courtenay in the regions of Loiret and Gâtinais. The House of Courtenay was a significant French family with close association with both the French, and thereby, English royal lines; in England the Courtenays were Earls of Devon.

Kennedy, alternately O'Kennedy and Kennedie, is a surname of Irish and Scottish origin that has also been used as a given name.

Keith Smith may refer to:

Andy is predominantly a diminutive version of the male given name Andrew, and variants of it such as Andreas and Andrei. The form of the variation is based on the Scottish "-ie" diminutive ending. Andrew is derived from the Greek name Andreas, meaning "manlike" or "brave". Andie is also occasionally used as a diminutive for the female given name Andrea in the English, German, Scandinavian and Spanish feminine version of the name Andrew. Although it is uncommon, some people named Alexander go by Andy. It is also occasionally spelled "Andie", "Andi", "Andii", or "Andee". The Indian names Anand and Anindya are also sometimes shortened to Andy.

Tyler is an English name derived from the Old French tieuleor, tieulier and the Middle English tyler, tylere. The name was originally an occupational name for one who makes or lays tiles. It is used both as a surname, and as given name for both sexes, but predominantly male. Among the earliest recorded uses of the surname is from the 14th century: Wat Tyler of Kent, South East England.

Tom is mostly used as a diminutive of Thomas. In Germanic countries and Scandinavia, "Tom" is in use as a formal given name. In modern Hebrew, the name Tom is used as a unisex name, with the meaning of "innocence, naivety, simplicity" or "the end.”