Tom Young (American football)

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Tom Young
Tom Young.png
Biographical details
Born(1907-06-08)June 8, 1907
DiedMarch 12, 1973(1973-03-12) (aged 65)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Playing career
Football
1926–1927 North Carolina
Baseball
1925–1928 North Carolina
Position(s) Halfback (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
?Lexington HS (NC)
1943 North Carolina
1946–1955 Western Carolina
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1946–1969 Western Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall44–59–4
Bowls0–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 North State (1949)

Thomas Bayard Young Jr. (June 8, 1907 – March 12, 1973) was an American football and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1943 and at Western Carolina University from 1946 to 1955, compiling a career college football record of 44–59–4. Young was also the athletic director at Western Carolina from 1946 until his retirement in 1969.

Contents

Young was a native of Monroe, North Carolina. [1] He played college football at North Carolina in 1926 and 1927, where he was an all-Southern Conference halfback. Young died at the age of 65 on March 12, 1973 at Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. [2]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
North Carolina Tar Heels (Southern Conference)(1943)
1943 North Carolina 6–32–2T–5th
North Carolina:6–32–2
Western Carolina Catamounts (North State Conference)(1946–1955)
1946 Western Carolina6–3–11–1–14th
1947 Western Carolina3–5–12–3T–5th
1948 Western Carolina7–33–12nd
1949 Western Carolina8–34–01stL Smoky Mountain
1950 Western Carolina3–61–47th
1951 Western Carolina3–61–4T–5th
1952 Western Carolina2–81–4T–5th
1953 Western Carolina1–90–57th
1954 Western Carolina4–5–12–2–14th
1955 Western Carolina1–8–11–46th
Western Carolina:38–56–416–28–2
Total:44–59–4
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. Allison, John O., ed. (1928). Yackety Yack 1928. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Publication Union of the University of North Carolina. p. 111. Retrieved November 16, 2011.
  2. "Funeral of Young today". Star-News . United Press International. March 14, 1973. Retrieved November 16, 2011.