Tom Zachary

Last updated
Tom Zachary
Tom Zachary.jpg
Pitcher
Born:(1896-05-07)May 7, 1896
Graham, North Carolina
Died: January 24, 1969(1969-01-24) (aged 72)
Burlington, North Carolina
Batted: LeftThrew: Left
MLB debut
July 11, 1918, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
May 28, 1936, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 186–191
Earned run average 3.73
Strikeouts 720
WHIP 1.437
Teams
Career highlights and awards

MLB Records:

  • 12-0 perfect season in 1929

Jonathan Thompson Walton Zachary (c. May 7, 1896 – January 24, 1969 ) was a professional baseball pitcher.

Contents

Career

He had a 19-year career in Major League Baseball that lasted from 1918 to 1936. He played for the Philadelphia A's, Washington Senators, St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees of the American League and the Boston Braves, Brooklyn Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies of the National League.

Zachary is well known for giving up Babe Ruth's record-setting 60th home run in 1927. Then the next year, pitching for Ruth's team, the New York Yankees, he won the third game of the World Series, defeating the St. Louis Cardinals.

1933 Goudey baseball card of Tom Zachary TomZacharyGoudeycard.jpg
1933 Goudey baseball card of Tom Zachary

Zachary went 12–0 for the 1929 Yankees, which is still the major league record for most pitching wins without a loss in one season. [1]

Zachary was a very good hitting pitcher, posting a .226 batting average (254-for-1122) with 79 runs, 6 home runs, 112 RBI and drawing 62 bases on balls. He had a career high 14 RBI in 1926 and batted a career high .306 (22-for-72) in 1928.

Related Research Articles

Jimmie Foxx American baseball player

James Emory Foxx, nicknamed "Double X" and "The Beast", was an American professional baseball first baseman who played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, and Philadelphia Phillies. His most productive years were with the Philadelphia Athletics and the Boston Red Sox, where he hit 30 or more home runs in 12 consecutive seasons and drove in more than 100 runs in 13 consecutive years.

Wes Ferrell American baseball player

Wesley Cheek "Wes" Ferrell was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball from 1927 through 1941. Primarily a starting pitcher, Ferrell played for the Cleveland Indians (1927–33), Boston Red Sox (1934–37), Washington Senators (1937–38), New York Yankees (1938–39), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940) and Boston Braves (1941). He batted and threw right-handed. Ferrell's 37 home runs as a batter remain a career record for an MLB pitcher.

Bob Shawkey American baseball player and manager

James Robert Shawkey was an American baseball pitcher who played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1915 to 1927. He batted and threw right-handed and served primarily as a starting pitcher.

Wally Schang American baseball player

Walter Henry (Wally) Schang was a catcher in Major League Baseball. From 1913 through 1931, he played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox (1918–20), New York Yankees (1921–25), St. Louis Browns (1926–29) and Detroit Tigers (1931). Schang was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was born in South Wales, New York.

Bullet Joe Bush American baseball player

Leslie Ambrose "Bullet Joe" Bush was an American Major League Baseball pitcher with the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, Pittsburgh Pirates and the New York Giants between 1912 and 1928. Bush batted and threw right-handed. He is credited with having developed the forkball pitch.

Fred Heimach American baseball player

Frederick Amos Heimach born in Camden, New Jersey, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1920–26), Boston Red Sox (1926), New York Yankees (1928–29) and Brooklyn Robins/Brooklyn Dodgers (1930–33). He helped the Yankees win the 1928 World Series.

George Earnshaw American baseball player

George Livingston Earnshaw was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He played in parts of nine seasons (1928–36) with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox, Brooklyn Dodgers, and St. Louis Cardinals. He was the American League wins leader in 1929 with the A's. For his career, he compiled a 127–93 record in 319 appearances, with a 4.38 ERA and 1,002 strikeouts. Earnshaw played on three American League pennant winners with the Athletics, winning the World Series in 1929 and 1930.

The 1999 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees sweeping the Atlanta Braves in the World Series.

The 1920 New York Yankees season was the 18th season for the Yankees in New York and their 20th overall. The team finished with a record of 95–59, just 3 games behind the American League champion Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Home games were played at the Polo Grounds. The Yankees of 1920 were the first team in the history of Major League Baseball to have an attendance of more than one million fans.

The 1927 New York Yankees season was the 25th season of the New York Yankees of the American League. The team finished with a record of 110–44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics and were tied for first or better for the whole season. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the 1927 World Series, they won, sweeping the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankees team was known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row", and is widely considered to be the greatest baseball team in MLB history.

The 1935 New York Yankees season was the team's 33rd season in New York and its 35th season overall. The team finished with a record of 89–60, finishing 3 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1951 New York Yankees season Major League Baseball season

The 1951 New York Yankees season was the 49th season for the team in New York, and its 51st season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 18th pennant, finishing five games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the New York Giants in 6 games.

The 1944 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing first in the American League with a record of 89 wins and 65 losses. In the World Series, they lost to the team they shared a stadium with, the Cardinals, four games to two.

The 1935 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 68–85, 31½ games behind the Chicago Cubs. The highlight of the season was the first night game in Major League baseball history when the Reds behind the arm of Paul Derringer prevailed over the Philadelphia Phillies 2-1 under the lights at Crosley Field in Cincinnati.

The 1930 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 59–95, 33 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

The 1935 Boston Braves season was the 65th season of the franchise. The Braves finished with the worst record in the National League and the majors, with a record of 38 wins and 115 losses.

The 1957 Milwaukee Braves season was the fifth in Milwaukee and the 87th overall season of the franchise. It was the year that the team won its first and only World Series championship while based in Milwaukee. The Braves won 95 games and lost 59 to win the National League pennant by eight games over the second-place St. Louis Cardinals.

1921 Detroit Tigers season Major League Baseball season

The 1921 Detroit Tigers finished in sixth place in the American League, 27 games behind the Yankees, with a record of 71–82. Despite their sixth-place finish, the 1921 Tigers amassed 1,724 hits and a team batting average of .316—the highest team hit total and batting average in American League history. Detroit outfielders Harry Heilmann and Ty Cobb finished No. 1 and No. 2 in the American League batting race with batting averages of .394 and .389, and all three Detroit outfielders ranked among the league leaders in batting average and RBIs. As early proof of the baseball adage that "Good Pitching Beats Good Hitting", the downfall of the 1921 Tigers was the absence of good pitching. The team ERA was 4.40, they allowed nine or more runs 28 times, and only one pitcher had an ERA below 4.24.

1947 Major League Baseball season Sports season

The 1947 Major League Baseball season, on opening day, the New York Giants were at the Phillies, the Yankees were home in the Bronx against the Philadelphia A's and the Brooklyn Dodgers were home to open against the Boston Braves at Ebbets Field. Jackie Robinson was in the Dodgers lineup, playing first base. This began a new chapter in Major League Baseball, as it was the first time an African American had been allowed to play in the league. There were more than 26,000 fans at Ebbets Field that day.

References