Tom Zerfoss

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Tom Zerfoss
Tom Zerfoss (c. 1915).jpg
Zerfoss in football uniform
Biographical details
Born(1895-06-15)June 15, 1895
Ashland, Kentucky
DiedAugust 5, 1988(1988-08-05) (aged 93)
Nashville, Tennessee
Playing career
Football
1915–1919 Vanderbilt
Basketball
1913–1914 Kentucky
1915–1920 Vanderbilt
Position(s) End, halfback (football)
Forward, center (basketball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1922–1924 Vanderbilt (assistant)
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1940–1944 Vanderbilt
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Basketball
1 SIAA (1920)
Awards
Football
All-Southern (1919)

Thomas Bowman Zerfoss (June 15, 1895 – August 5, 1988) was an American football and basketball player and coach. He played for both the Kentucky Wildcats of the University of Kentucky and the Vanderbilt Commodores of Vanderbilt University. He coached the latter's freshman football team and served as an assistant under head coach Dan McGugin. Zerfoss was selected as an All-Southern football player in 1919 by Charles A. Reinhart, sporting editor for the Louisville Courier-Journal , and J. L. Ray, sporting editor for the Nashville Tennessean . [1] Zerfoss also was captain of the 1919–20 SIAA champion basketball team which went 14–4. [2] As a player, he weighed 155 pounds.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team with possession of the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without possession of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays; if they fail, they turn over the football to the defense, but if they succeed, they are given a new set of four downs to continue the drive. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Basketball Team sport

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

Kentucky Wildcats Intercollegiate sports teams of the University of Kentucky

The Kentucky Wildcats are the men's and women's intercollegiate athletic squads of the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. Historically, the women's teams and athletes were referred to as the "Lady Kats", but all athletic squads adopted the "Wildcats" nickname in 1995. Collectively, the fans of the Kentucky Wildcats are often referred to as the Big Blue Nation. Their main and most hated rival is the University of Louisville.

He graduated from Vanderbilt with an M. D. The Zerfoss Student Health Center at Vanderbilt bears his name. A plaque upon it reads "Named in honor of Thomas Bowman Zerfoss Sr., M.D. ... physician, guide, philosopher and friend to Vanderbilt students for more than 40 years." [3] Zerfoss was Vanderbilt's athletic director from 1940 to 1944. During the nationwide anti-tuberculosis campaign, Vanderbilt issued a mandatory tuberculosis screening of all students in 1948. Students complied by making appointments for chest X-rays with Zerfoss. [4]

Doctor of Medicine is a medical degree, the meaning of which varies between different jurisdictions. In the United States, Canada and some other countries, the MD denotes a professional graduate degree awarded upon graduation from medical school. In the United States, this generally arose because many in 18th century medical profession trained in Scotland, which used the M.D. degree nomenclature. In England, however, Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery was used and eventually in the 19th century became the standard in Scotland too. Thus, in the United Kingdom, Ireland and other countries, the MD is a research doctorate, higher doctorate, honorary doctorate or applied clinical degree restricted to those who already hold a professional degree in medicine; in those countries, the equivalent professional to the North American and some others use of M.D is still typically titled Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS).

An athletic director is an administrator at many clubs or institutions, like colleges and universities, as well as in larger high schools and middle schools, who oversees the work of coaches and related staff involved in athletic programs.

Tuberculosis Infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) bacteria. Tuberculosis generally affects the lungs, but can also affect other parts of the body. Most infections do not have symptoms, in which case it is known as latent tuberculosis. About 10% of latent infections progress to active disease which, if left untreated, kills about half of those affected. The classic symptoms of active TB are a chronic cough with blood-containing mucus, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. It was historically called "consumption" due to the weight loss. Infection of other organs can cause a wide range of symptoms.

It was Zerfoss who got tennis great Joe C. Davis, Jr. to come to Vanderbilt. [5]

Related Research Articles

Vanderbilt Commodores intercollegiate sports teams of Vanderbilt University

The Vanderbilt Commodores are the intercollegiate athletic teams that represent Vanderbilt University, located in Nashville, Tennessee. Vanderbilt fields 16 varsity teams, 14 of which compete at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). Vanderbilt's women's lacrosse team plays in the American Athletic Conference. The bowling team plays in the Southland Bowling League. The University of Tennessee Volunteers are Vanderbilt's primary athletic rival, and the only other SEC team in Tennessee.

Dan McGugin American college football player and coach

Daniel Earle McGugin was an American football player and coach, as well as a lawyer. He served as the head football coach at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee from 1904 to 1917 and again from 1919 to 1934, compiling a record of 197–55–19. He is the winningest head coach in the history of the university. McGugin was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951 as part of its inaugural class. He was the brother-in-law of University of Michigan coach Fielding H. Yost.

Thomas Andrew Gill American college football coach, college basketball coach

Thomas Andrew Gill was an American football, and baseball player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball.

Josh Cody All-American college football player, college basketball coach, college football coach, College Football Hall of Fame member, college athletic director

Joshua Crittenden Cody was an American college athlete, head coach, and athletics director. Cody was a native of Tennessee and an alumnus of Vanderbilt University, where he played several sports. As a versatile tackle on the football team, he was a three-time All-American. In 1969, Cody was named by the Football Writers Association of America to the 1869–1918 Early Era All-American Team. He was inducted as a player into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1970.

1915 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

The 1915 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University during the 1915 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. Dan McGugin served his 12th season as the Commodores' head coach. Vanderbilt was a member of the SIAA. They faced a 10-game schedule. Vanderbilt scored 459 points in its first seven shutout games, and 514 points in 510 minutes of actual playing time by season's end, making it a legitimate "point-a-minute team" leading the nation in scoring with a school record still unequaled today.

1922 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

The 1922 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University during the 1922 Southern Conference football season. During the season, Dan McGugin's 18th as head coach, Vanderbilt compiled a record of 8–0–1 and outscored its opponents 177 to 16. The Commodores' defense was unrivaled in the South, leading the nation in giving up just 1.8 points per game, none of them at home.

Joseph Columbus Davis Jr. was an American businessman and tennis player.

The 1919 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University in the 1919 college football season. The 1919 season was Dan McGugin's 15th year as head coach. McGugin was returning from his stent in the Army during World War I where he was relieved by interim head coach Ray Morrison. Josh Cody was selected third-team All-America by Walter Camp, for the second time.

Alfred T. Adams American gridiron football player

Alfred Thompson Adams was an attorney and an American football and basketball player and coach. He played for the Vanderbilt Commodores of Vanderbilt University.

1917 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1917 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1917 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. Georgia Tech won the SIAA and the south's first national championship. Walker Carpenter and Everett Strupper were the first two players from the Deep South selected first-team All-American.

1919 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1919 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1919 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season.

1920 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1920 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1920 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season.

The College Football All-Southern Team was an all-star team of college football players from the Southern United States. The honor was given annually to the best players at their respective positions. It is analogous to the All-America Team and was most often selected in newspapers. Notable pickers of All-Southern teams include John Heisman, Dan McGugin, Grantland Rice, W. A. Lambeth, Reynolds Tichenor, Nash Buckingham, Innis Brown, and Dick Jemison.

1922 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1922 College Football All-Southern Team consists of college football players chosen by various organizations and writers for College Football All-Southern Teams for the 1922 Southern Conference football season. It was the first season of the Southern Conference.

1911 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1911 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1911 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. Ray Morrison and Harry Costello were selected for Outing magazine's "Football Honor List for 1911" selected by coaches from the East and West. Vanderbilt won the SIAA championship.

1910 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1910 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1910 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. Vanderbilt post the best record in the SIAA, the only blemish on its record a scoreless tie with defending national champion Yale. Auburn also posted an undefeated conference record, but lost to Texas.

1907 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1907 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1907 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. Fielding Yost selected Bob Blake for his All-America first team. Vanderbilt won the SIAA championship.

1906 College Football All-Southern Team

The 1906 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1906 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. For some, the SIAA champion 1906 Vanderbilt Commodores football team made up the entire team. It would produce 8 of the composite 11. Owsley Manier was selected by Walter Camp third-team All-American. Vanderbilt won the SIAA championship.

Carey Spicer American football and basketball player and coach

Carey Alvin Spicer, Jr. was a two-time All-American basketball player at the University of Kentucky. He captained Adolph Rupp's first team in 1930-31, and became Rupp's first All-American. He was also an All-Conference Quarterback for the football team who played varsity tennis and ran track. Rupp called him "one of the greatest athletes in University of Kentucky history."

References

  1. "All-Southern Elevens". Spalding Football Guide. 1920–1921. pp. 41, 69, 27, 67.
  2. Roy M. Neel. Dynamite! 75 Years of Vanderbilt Basketball. p. 244.
  3. "Tom Zerfoss".
  4. The Vanderbilt Hustler October 15, 1948
  5. Bill Traughber (April 18, 2007). "CHC: Joe Davis Former Tennis Great" (PDF).