Tomaszew, Koło County

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Tomaszew
Village
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Tomaszew
Coordinates: 52°10′29″N18°51′41″E / 52.1748°N 18.8614°E / 52.1748; 18.8614 Coordinates: 52°10′29″N18°51′41″E / 52.1748°N 18.8614°E / 52.1748; 18.8614
Country Flag of Poland.svg Poland
Voivodeship Greater Poland
County Koło
Gmina Olszówka

Tomaszew [tɔˈmaʂɛf] is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Olszówka, within Koło County, Greater Poland Voivodeship, in west-central Poland. [1]

Village Small clustered human settlement smaller than a town

A village is a clustered human settlement or community, larger than a hamlet but smaller than a town, with a population ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand. Though villages are often located in rural areas, the term urban village is also applied to certain urban neighborhoods. Villages are normally permanent, with fixed dwellings; however, transient villages can occur. Further, the dwellings of a village are fairly close to one another, not scattered broadly over the landscape, as a dispersed settlement.

Gmina Olszówka Gmina in Greater Poland, Poland

Gmina Olszówka is a rural gmina in Koło County, Greater Poland Voivodeship, in west-central Poland. Its seat is the village of Olszówka, which lies approximately 14 kilometres (9 mi) east of Koło and 133 km (83 mi) east of the regional capital Poznań.

Koło County County in Greater Poland, Poland

Koło County is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Greater Poland Voivodeship, west-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Koło, which lies 119 kilometres (74 mi) east of the regional capital Poznań. The county contains three other towns: Kłodawa, 21 km (13 mi) east of Koło, Dąbie, 19 km (12 mi) south-east of Koło, and Przedecz, 21 km (13 mi) north-east of Koło.

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References

  1. "Central Statistical Office (GUS) - TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)" (in Polish). 2008-06-01.