Tomato knife

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Wusthof tomato knife with tomatoes Tomato knife.jpg
Wüsthof tomato knife with tomatoes

A tomato knife is a small serrated kitchen knife designed to slice through tomatoes. The serrated edge allows the knife to penetrate the tomatoes’ skin quickly and with a minimum of pressure without crushing the flesh. Many tomato knives have forked tips that allow the user to lift and move the tomato slices after they have been cut. [1] [2]

Serrations are not required to cut tomatoes – a sharp straight blade works – but the serrations allow the knife to cut tomatoes and other foods even when dull. The reason for this being most of the cutting takes place in the serrations themselves. [3] Some knives have serrations on both sides allowing easy slicing for both left-handed and right-handed users. Bread knives and steak knives are similarly serrated. [4]

See also

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References

  1. John Peterson (1 September 2009). Farmer John's Cookbook. Gibbs Smith. pp. 229–. ISBN   978-1-4236-1411-1.
  2. Carol Byrd-Bredbenner (2002). Fresh Tastes from the Garden State. Rutgers University Press. pp. 102–. ISBN   978-0-8135-3129-8.
  3. Emily Hadson (19 September 2010). How to Sharpen a Knife? (Knife Sharpening Techniques). Gibbs Smith. pp. 229–. ISBN   978-1-4236-1411-1.
  4. Sur La Table; Sarah Jay (21 October 2008). Knives Cooks Love: Selection. Care. Techniques. Recipes. Andrews McMeel Publishing. p. 37. ISBN   978-0-7407-7002-9.