Tomb of Salim Chishti

Last updated

The tomb of Shaikh Salim Chisti is considered to be one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture in India. Fatehpur Sikri near Agra 2016-03 img02.jpg
The tomb of Shaikh Salim Chisti is considered to be one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture in India.

The Tomb of Salim Chishti is famed as one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture in India, built during the years 1580 and 1581, along with the imperial complex at Fatehpur Sikri near Zenana Rauza and facing south towards Buland Darwaza, within the quadrangle of the Jama Masjid which measures 350 ft. by 440 ft. [1] It enshrines the burial place of the Sufi saint, Salim Chisti (1478 – 1572), a descendant of Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti of Ajmer, and who lived in a cavern on the ridge at Sikri. [2] The mausoleum, constructed by Akbar as a mark of his respect for the Sufi saint, who foretold the birth of Akbar's son, who was named as Prince Salim after the Sufi Saint and later jahangir succeeded Akbar to the throne of the Mughal Empire, [1]

Contents

Architecture

Intricate Jali, stone latticework window,looking into the quadrangle of the Jama Masjid Salim Chishti Tomb-2.jpg
Intricate Jali , stone latticework window,looking into the quadrangle of the Jama Masjid
Wooden canopy over the inner tomb, with an inlaid mosaic of mother-of-pearl Salim Chishti Tomb-1.jpg
Wooden canopy over the inner tomb, with an inlaid mosaic of mother-of-pearl

The tomb has been constructed on a platform that is about 1 m. high, a flight of five steps leading to the entrance portico. The main tomb building is enclosed by delicate marble screens on all sides, and the tomb is located in the centre of the main hall, which has a single semi-circular dome. The marble building is beautifully carved and has an ivory-like appearance. The plinth is ornamented with mosaics of black and yellow marble arranged in geometric patterns. An ebony "chhaparkhat" enclosure surrounds the marble cenotaph, which is usually covered by a green cloth. A wooden canopy incrusted with mother-of-pearl inlay mosaic over it. [3]

The door to the main chamber is intricately carved with arabesque patterns and bears inscriptions from the Quran. Brown marble borders the interior bays while the relief panels - with the Quran verses - have a blue background. The carved and painted tomb chamber has a white marble floor, which is inlaid with multicolored stones. The multicoloured stones which are also a piece of diamond ruby or emreld.

Belief

Devotees ask for the blessings of the saint and seek fulfillment of their wishes. It is believed that tying a thread on the marble screens of the main tomb building serves as a constant reminder to the saint of their wishes. This tomb is known for Child Birth Blessing.it is also believed that it has the finest canopy buildings that give the devotees blessings.

Here's a compilation of all the Jali's around the tomb of Salim Chishti. Jali (Stone latticework) around Salim Chishti Tomb.jpg
Here's a compilation of all the Jali's around the tomb of Salim Chishti.

Related Research Articles

Chishti Order Sufi order in Islam

The Chishtī Order is a Sunni Sufi order within the mystic Sufi tradition of Islam. It began in Chisht, a small town near Herat, Afghanistan, about 930 CE. The Chishti Order is known for its emphasis on love, tolerance, and openness. Chishti Sharif is name of village in Afghanistan near Iran border.

Fatehpur Sikri Town in Uttar Pradesh, India

Fatehpur Sikri is a town in the Agra District of Uttar Pradesh, India. The city itself was founded as the capital of Mughal Empire in 1571 by Emperor Akbar, serving this role from 1571 to 1585, when Akbar abandoned it due to a campaign in Punjab and was later completely abandoned in 1610.

Sheesh Mahal (Lahore Fort)

The Sheesh Mahal is located within the Shah Burj block in northern-western corner of Lahore Fort. It was constructed under the reign of Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in 1631–32. The ornate white marble pavilion is inlaid with pietra dura and complex mirror-work of the finest quality. The hall was reserved for personal use by the imperial family and close aides. It is among the 21 monuments that were built by successive Mughal emperors inside Lahore Fort, and forms the "jewel in the Fort’s crown." As part of the larger Lahore Fort Complex, it has been inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1981.

Mughal architecture Indo-Islamic architecture from 16th to 18th century India

Mughal architecture is the type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent. It developed the styles of earlier Muslim dynasties in India as an amalgam of Islamic, Persian, Turkic and Indian architecture. Mughal buildings have a uniform pattern of structure and character, including large bulbous domes, slender minarets at the corners, massive halls, large vaulted gateways, and delicate ornamentation; Examples of the style can be found in modern-day India, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Pakistan.

Tomb of Itimād-ud-Daulah Building in India

Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is a Mughal mausoleum in the city of Agra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. Often described as a "jewel box", sometimes called the "Bachcha Taj", the tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is often regarded as a draft of the Taj Mahal.

Qutbuddin Bakhtiar Kaki Indian Sufi (1173-1235)

Qutb ul Aqtab Khwaja Sayyid Muhammad Bakhtiyar AlHussaini Qutbuddin Bakhtiar Kaki (born 1173-died 1235) was a Muslim Sufi mystic, saint and scholar of the Chishti Order from Delhi, India. He was the disciple and the spiritual successor of Moinuddin Chishti as head of the Chishti order, and the person to whom the Qutb Minar, Delhi is dedicated. Before him the Chishti order in India was confined to Ajmer and Nagaur. He played a major role in establishing the order securely in Delhi. His dargah located adjacent to Zafar Mahal in Mehrauli, and the oldest dargah in Delhi, is also the venue of his annual Urs festivities. The Urs was held in high regard by many rulers of Delhi like Qutbuddin Aibak, Iltutmish who built a nearby stepwell, Gandhak ki Baoli for him, Sher Shah Suri who built a grand gateway, Bahadur Shah I who built the Moti Masjid mosque nearby and Farrukhsiyar who added a marble screen and a mosque.

Mariam-uz-Zamani Wife of Mughal emperor Akbar

Mariam-uz-Zamani was a wife of the third Mughal emperor, Akbar. In subsequent centuries, she has been referred to with several other names, including Hira Kunwari, Harkha Bai and Jodha Bai.

Buland Darwaza

Buland Darwaza, or the "Door of victory", was built in 1602 A.D. by Mughal emperor Akbar to commemorate his victory over Gujarat. It is the main entrance to the Jama Masjid at Fatehpur Sikri, which is 43 km from Agra, India.

Salim Chishti Sufi saint of the Chishti Order during the Mughal Empire in India

Salim Chishti (1478–1572) was a Sufi saint of the Chishti Order during the Mughal Empire in India.

<i>Jali</i>

A jali or jaali, is the term for a perforated stone or latticed screen, usually with an ornamental pattern constructed through the use of calligraphy and geometry. This form of architectural decoration is common in Indo-Islamic architecture and more generally in Islamic architecture.

Ibadat Khana Meeting house built in 1575 by Mughal Emperor Akbar for interfaith dialogue

The Ibādat Khāna was a meeting house built in 1575 CE by the Mughal Emperor Akbar at Fatehpur Sikri to gather spiritual leaders of different religious grounds so as to conduct a discussion on the teachings of the respective religious leaders.

Akbars tomb

Akbar's tomb is the tomb of the Mughal emperor Akbar. This tomb is an important Mughal architectural masterpiece. It was built in 1605–1613 by his son Jahangir and is situated in 119 acres of grounds in Sikandra, a sub of Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Culture of Uttar Pradesh

The Culture of Uttar Pradesh is an Indian Culture which has its roots in the Hindi and Urdu literature, music, fine arts, drama and cinema. Lucknow, the capital of Uttar Pradesh, has several beautiful historical monuments such as Bara Imambara and Chhota Imambara. It has also preserved the damaged complex of the Oudh-period British Resident's quarters, which are being restored.

Tomb of Mariam-uz-Zamani

The Tomb of Mariam-uz-Zamani is the mausoleum of Mariam-uz-Zamani, the Queen consort of the Mughal Emperor Akbar. The tomb was built by Jahangir, in memory of his mother Mariam-uz-Zamani. The tomb is located in Sikandra, a suburb of Agra.

Tourism in Uttar Pradesh

Situated in the northern part of India, bordering with the capital of India New Delhi, Uttar Pradesh is one of the most popular and an established tourist destination for both Indians and non-Indians alike in India. The most populous state of India, Uttar Pradesh contains many historical monuments and places of religious significance. Geographically, Uttar Pradesh is very diverse, with Himalayan foothills in the extreme north and the Gangetic Plain in the centre. It is also home of India's most visited sites, the Taj Mahal, and Hinduism's holiest city, Varanasi. Kumbh city, Allahabad. Kathak, one of the eight forms of Indian classical dances, originated from Uttar Pradesh. Uttar Pradesh is at the heart of India, hence it is also known as The Heartland of India. Cuisine of Uttar Pradesh like Awadhi cuisine, Mughlai cuisine, Kumauni cuisine are very famous not only in India but also many places abroad.and pratapgarh is also famous for Rajputana

Jama Mosque, Fatehpur Sikri

The Jama Masjid is a 17th-century mosque in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Fatehpur Sikri in India. The Mughal emperor Akbar personally directed the building of the Jama Masjid, which stretches some 540 feet in length. The mosque also known as the "Friday Mosque" is one of the largest mosques in both India and in the world. It is a most sought after pilgrimage site by the devotees. It is also one of the most visited tourist destinations in Agra district. Some of the designs of the mosque reflect beautiful Iranian architecture.

Akbari architecture

Akbar’s architecture refers to the style of Indo-Islamic architecture conceived during the reign of Mughal Emperor Akbar using elite Indic architectural vocabulary. His successors further added to this style, leading to the unique and individualistic style of Mughal architecture. Some examples of this style are Humayun's Tomb, which was the first of a long succession of garden-tombs, the Agra Fort, the Allahabad Fort, the Lahore Fort, the abandoned city of Fatehpur Sikri and Akbar's own tomb.

Ajmer Sharif Dargah Sufi shrine of Moinuddin Chishti at Ajmer, Rajasthan, India

Ajmer Sharif Dargah, Ajmer Dargah, Ajmer Sharif or Dargah Sharif is a sufi shrine (dargah) of the revered sufi saint, Moinuddin Chishti, located at Ajmer, Rajasthan, India. The shrine has Chisti's grave (Maqbara).

<i>Persian Inscriptions on Indian Monuments</i>

Persian Inscriptions on Indian Monuments is a book written in Persian by Dr Ali Asghar Hekmat E Shirazi and published in 1956 and 1958 and 2013. new edition contains the Persian texts of more than 200 epigraphical inscriptions found on historical monuments in India, many of which are currently listed as national heritage sites or registered as UNESCO world heritage, published in Persian; an English edition is also being printed.

References

  1. 1 2 "Fatehpur Sikri". Imperial Gazetteer of India (v. 12). Oxford. pp. 84–85.
  2. "World Heritage Sites - Fatehpur Sikri (1986), Uttar Pradesh". Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) website.
  3. "Indian Empire". Imperial Gazetteer of India ( V. 2). Oxford. p. 126.