Tombali Region

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Coordinates: 11°15′N15°0′W / 11.250°N 15.000°W / 11.250; -15.000

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Tombali
Guinea-Bissau - Tombali.svg
Tombali Region
Country Guinea-Bissau
Seat Catió
Sectors Bedanda, Cacine, Catió, Quebo  [ pt ], Komo
Area
  Total3,736.5 km2 (1,442.7 sq mi)
Population
 (2009 census)
  Total94,939
  Density25/km2 (66/sq mi)
ISO 3166 code GW-TO

Tombali is one of the eight regions in southern Guinea-Bissau and its capital is Catió. There has not been any local administration since the civil war of 1998-99 and all the social services are done by organs of civil society and other government agencies. It is a coastal region covered with mangrove swamps, rain forest and tangled forest and receives an annual rainfall of more than 1,000 mm (39 in)

As of 2009, the total population of the region was 91,089, with the urban population being 12,967 and rural being 78,122. The sex ratio of the region is 94 females for every hundred males. As of 2009, the net activity rate was 54.77 per cent, proportion of employed labour force was 37.86 per cent, proportion of labour force was 75.74 and the proportion of potentially active population was 37.86 per cent, with the major economic activity being fishing. The absolute poverty rate, people earning less than $2 a day, in the region stood at 69.1 per cent, with a regional contribution of 11.2 per cent to the national poverty totals.

Geography

Tombali is a low-lying coastal region and the low-lying coastal areas are periodically submerged during high tide. All the coastal regions have a maximum elevation of 300 m (980 ft). The internal region has plains, which are interspersed with rias. There are lot of meandering rivers, many of them forming estuaries in the coastal regions. The principal river, Cacheu, flows through the region. The climate is hot and tropical and the region has two seasons. The onset of summer is from December to May with April - May period having temperature ranges from 20 °C (68 °F) to 30 °C (86 °F). The rainy season is usually from May to November. The region receives an average rainfall of around 2,000 mm (79 in) compared to the inland regions, which receive 1,000 mm (39 in). The coastal regions are covered with Mangrove swamps, rain forest and tangled forest. [1]

Administration

Sectors of Tombali Tombali sectors.png
Sectors of Tombali
Coat of Arms during Portuguese Rule Catio.PNG
Coat of Arms during Portuguese Rule

Tombali is divided into five sectors namely Bedanda, Cacine, Catio, Quebo  [ pt ] and Komo. Guinea-Bissau got independence from Portugal on 24 September 1973 after wars and diplomatic political actions under the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC), while Portugal accepted the independence of Cape Verde on 5 July 1975. PAIGC ruled both the countries after independence. While international funds came pouring in for the economic development of the nation, the party was accused of misusing power in authoritarian manner. The one-party state mechanism was turbulent during the period of 1980s and 1990s with army taking control of power more frequently and the resultant civil war resulted in loss of property and lives. To decentralize power, an administrative region and eight regions were created. [2] There has not been any local administration since the civil war of 1998-99 and all the social services are done by organs of civil society and other government agencies. There is minimal health and education services offered by the government and all the government departments have operated in a limited fashion. A transitional government was selected during 2003-4 with an adopted Public Transition Charter. The Military Committee appointed two civilians as interim President and Prime Minister. Elections were held for a five year term on 24 July 2005 with a multi party representation. [3] There was a military coup in 2012, after which EU and international donations stopped. The latest elections were held during April 2014 with 13 Presidential candidates and representation from 15 parties. The elections were monitored by 550 international observers. [4] Jose Mario Vaz and his party, won the Presidential and parliamentary elections against the military backed Nuno Gomes Nabiam. [5]

Demographics

Historical population
YearPop.±%
200586,348    
200687,518+1.4%
200788,697+1.3%
200889,888+1.3%
200991,089+1.3%
201092,300+1.3%
201193,521+1.3%
201294,752+1.3%
Sources: [6]

As of 2009, the total population of the region was 91,089, with the urban population being 12,967 and rural being 78,122. The sex ratio of the region is 94 females for every hundred males. The total resident population in the region is 91,089. The total agricultural population in the region is 41,746. The average number of household in the region is 8.1 and the density of the population is 24.4 sq. km. The intercensal rate of average annual growth (adjusted data) is 1.61 per cent. The non-agricultural population in the country is 49,343. The total number of households per capita in the region is 11,272. The fraction of Christians in the region is 14.7 per cent, Muslims is 43.00 per cent, animists is 24.10 per cent, not detailed was 17.80 per cent and people following no religion was 0.4 per cent. [6]

Economy

Boys from Catio Boys from Catio (3781393117).jpg
Boys from Catio

As of 2009, the net activity rate was 54.77 per cent, proportion of employed labour force was 37.86 per cent, proportion of labour force was 75.74 and the proportion of potentially active population was 37.86 per cent. [7] The major economic activity in the parts around the rivers and the coastal areas was fishing, while it was agriculture in the inland areas. As of 2011, the total population which was active constitutes 60 per cent nationwide indicating there are lot of employed people. But the poverty rate was very high in the country with an estimated two-thirds below the poverty line. Out of the working population, an estimated 58.4 per cent are employed in freelance activities, while wage earners formed 42 per cent. The unemployment in the region as of 2001 was 10.2 per cent, compared to the capital Bissau which has 19.3 per cent. Totally 63.5 per cent were employed in agriculture (including forestry), 8.9 in industry and 6.1 per cent in public administration. As per IMF report in 2011, people who were engaged in agriculture were poorer compared to others, while educated and higher educated people earned more. The absolute poverty rate, people earning less than $2 a day, in the region stood at 69.1 per cent, with a regional contribution of 11.2 per cent to the national poverty totals. [8]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Politics of Guinea-Bissau

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Gabú Region is the easternmost region in Guinea-Bissau. Its capital is Gabú. The region borders Senegal to the north, Guinea to the east and south and the Guinea-Bissau regions of Tombali and Bafatá to the west. It covers an area of 9,150 km2, making it the largest of Guinea-Bissau's administrative regions. It is an inland region covered with Savannah or light Savannah woodland and receives an annual rainfall of more than 2,000 mm (79 in).

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Guinea-Bissau War of Independence

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Gash-Barka Region Region of Eritrea

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Southern Red Sea Region Region of Eritrea

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Quinara Region Region of Guinea-Bissau

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Cacheu Region Region of Guinea-Bissau

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Biombo Region Region of Guinea-Bissau

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Northern Red Sea Region Region of Eritrea

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References

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  2. Mendy, Peter Karibe; Lobban Jr. (2013). Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Guinea-Bissau. Scarecrow Press. pp. 3–8. ISBN   9780810880276.
  3. Republic of Guinea-Bissau Public Administration, Country Profile (PDF) (Report). Division for Public Administration and Development Management (DPADM), Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA),United Nations. 2004. p. 7. Retrieved 15 November 2016.
  4. "Guinea-Bissau votes for new president and parliament". BBC.com. 13 April 2014. Retrieved 15 November 2016.
  5. "Guinea-Bissau: Presidential runoff vote held". AP. 20 May 2014. Retrieved 15 November 2016.
  6. 1 2 "Census of Guinea Bissau, 2012". Central National Institute of Statistics, Guinea Bissau. 2012. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  7. "Work profile Guinea Bissau, 2012". Central National Institute of Statistics, Guinea Bissau. 2012. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  8. Guinea-Bwassau: Second Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper issues 11-353 of IMF country report. International Monetary Fund. 2011. p. 11. ISBN   9781452785943.