Tomești, Iași

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Tomești
ROU IS Tomesti CoA.jpg
Coat of arms
Tomesti jud Iasi.png
Location in Iași County
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Red pog.svg
Tomești
Location in Romania
Coordinates: 47°08′N27°42′E / 47.133°N 27.700°E / 47.133; 27.700 Coordinates: 47°08′N27°42′E / 47.133°N 27.700°E / 47.133; 27.700
CountryFlag of Romania.svg  Romania
County Iași
Population
 (2011) [1]
11,051
Time zone EET/EEST (UTC+2/+3)
Vehicle reg. IS

Tomești is a commune in Iași County, Western Moldavia, Romania, part of the Iași metropolitan area. It is composed of four villages: Chicerea, Goruni, Tomești and Vlădiceni.

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References

  1. "Populaţia stabilă pe judeţe, municipii, oraşe şi localităti componenete la RPL_2011" (in Romanian). National Institute of Statistics. Retrieved 4 February 2014.