Tome Arsovski

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Tome Arsovski (23 September[ citation needed ] 1928 [1] – 22 April 2007) was a Macedonian dramatist. He was born in Kosovska Mitrovica. [2] He studied Slavistics at the Faculty of Philosophy in Skopje. [2] Many of his works are set during World War II or in post-war Macedonia and explore the hardships facing the people, although some are more light-hearted in subject. [3] His works such as The Paradox of Diogenes (1961), Hoops (1965) and A Step Into Autumn (1969) are described by The Columbia Encyclopedia of Modern Drama as being "characterized by strong social commitment and analysis of social anomalies and their effect on the fate of the individual". [4] His The Paradox of Diogenes is a courtroom drama which "focuses sharply on the relationship between the individual and society". [3] [5]

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References

  1. Rubin, Don; Nagy, Péter; Rouyer, Philippe (eds) (13 September 2013). The World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre: Volume 1: Europe. Routledge. p. 573. ISBN   978-1-136-40289-0.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  2. 1 2 Vojislav Ilić (1971). Živan Milisavac (ed.). Jugoslovenski književni leksikon[Yugoslav Literary Lexicon] (in Serbo-Croatian). Novi Sad (SAP Vojvodina, SR Serbia): Matica srpska. p. 547-548.CS1 maint: unrecognized language (link)
  3. 1 2 McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of World Drama: An International Reference Work in 5 Volumes. McGraw-Hill. 1984. p. 200. ISBN   978-0-07-079169-5.
  4. Cody, Gabrielle H.; Sprinchorn, Evert (2007). The Columbia Encyclopedia of Modern Drama. Columbia University Press. p. 845. ISBN   978-0-231-14424-7.
  5. "TOME ARSOVSKI". In Loving Memory of. Retrieved 18 June 2015.