Tomigusuku Chōshun

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Tomigusuku Chōshun
豊見城 朝春
sessei of Ryukyu
In office
1831–1832
Preceded by Haneji Chōmei
Succeeded by Urasoe Chōki
Personal details
Born?
Shuri, Ryukyu Kingdom
DiedSeptember 23, 1832
Kagoshima, Satsuma Domain, Japan
Parents Tomigusuku Chōkō (father)
Chinese name Shō Kai (尚 楷)
Rank Wōji
Portrait of Prince Tomigusuku by Toda Ujitsune on 17 December 1832 (Japanese calendar: 16 November, Tenpo 3) in Edo, Japan. In fact this man is the Futenma Choten, a political decoy of Prince Tomigusuku. Prince Tomigusuku died on 23 September 1832 (Chinese calendar: 29 August, Daoguang 12) in Kagoshima. Portrait of Prince Tomigusuku.jpg
Portrait of Prince Tomigusuku by Toda Ujitsune on 17 December 1832 (Japanese calendar: 16 November, Tenpō 3) in Edo, Japan. In fact this man is the Futenma Chōten, a political decoy of Prince Tomigusuku. Prince Tomigusuku died on 23 September 1832 (Chinese calendar: 29 August, Daoguang 12) in Kagoshima.

Tomigusuku Wōji Chōshun(豊見城 王子 朝春, ? 23 September 1832), also known by his Chinese style name Shō Kai(尚 楷), was a royal of Ryukyu Kingdom.

Tomigusuku Chōshun was the seventh head of a royal family called Tomigusuku Udun (豊見城御殿). He was the eldest son of Tomigusuku Chōkō (豊見城 朝興). [1] His rank was Aji at first. In 1831, he was appointed as sessei , and elevated to the rank Wōji, which was the highest rank among royals. [2]

King Shō Iku dispatched a gratitude envoy for his taking power to Edo, Japan in 1832. He and Takushi Ando (沢岻 安度, also known by Mō Ishin 毛 惟新) was appointed as Envoy(正使,seishi) and Deputy Envoy(副使,fukushi) respectively. However, he died in Kagoshima on 23 September 1832 (by the Japanese calendar, the 29th day, 8th month, of the year Tenpō-3). Futenma Chōten (普天間 朝典, also known by Shō Kan 向 寛) served as the political decoy of him, took his title "Prince Tomigusuku" and went to Edo. [3] He buried in Kagoshima.

Prince Tomigusuku was father-in-law of King Shō Iku. [4] He was also grandfather of King Shō Tai. [5]

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References

  1. Rizō, Takeuchi. (1992). Okinawa-ken seishi kakei daijiten (沖縄県姓氏家系大辞典). Tokyo: Kadokawa Shoten.
  2. 中山王府相卿伝職年譜 向祐等著写本
  3. Chūzan Seifu , appendix vol.5
  4. Chūzan Seifu , vol.12
  5. Chūzan Seifu , vol.13
Tomigusuku Chōshun
Preceded by
Tomigusuku Chōkō
Head of Tomigusuku Udun Succeeded by
Tomigusuku Chōson
Political offices
Preceded by
Haneji Chōmei
Sessei of Ryukyu
1831 - 1832
Succeeded by
Urasoe Chōki