Tomilin Glacier

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Tomilin Glacier ( 69°30′S159°0′E / 69.500°S 159.000°E / -69.500; 159.000 Coordinates: 69°30′S159°0′E / 69.500°S 159.000°E / -69.500; 159.000 ) is a glacier over 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, draining north from Pope Mountain in central Wilson Hills. It enters the sea east of Goodman Hills and Cape Kinsey, forming a substantial glacier tongue. The glacier was photographed from aircraft of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in 1947, and by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1958. Named by the latter for Soviet polar aviator Mikhail N. Tomilin (1908–52), who perished in the Arctic.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Glacier Persistent body of ice that is moving under its own weight

A glacier is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.

Pope Mountain is a largely ice-free mountain rising directly at the head of Tomilin Glacier, 3 nautical miles (6 km) southeast of Governor Mountain, in the Wilson Hills. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Thomas J. Pope, U.S. Navy Reserve, Navigator in LC-130F Hercules aircraft during Operation Deep Freeze, 1968.


PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Tomilin Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.



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The Goodman Hills are a group of coastal hills in Antarctica, of about 10 nautical miles (20 km) extent, rising directly south of Cape Kinsey and between Paternostro Glacier and Tomilin Glacier. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photography, 1960–63, and were named for Commander Kelsey B. Goodman, U.S. Navy, Plans Officer on the staff of the Commander, Naval Support Force Antarctica, 1969–72; Assistant for Polar Regions in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, 1972–74; Member of the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names, U.S. Board on Geographic Names, 1973–76.

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The Holladay Nunataks are a cluster of nunataks 3 nautical miles (6 km) in extent, occupying the central part of the peninsula between the terminus of Tomilin Glacier and the Gillett Ice Shelf. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and were named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Billy W. Holladay, Chief Aviation Electronics Technician, U.S. Navy, who was Maintenance Control Chief at McMurdo Station during Operation Deep Freeze, 1968.