Tomlins

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Tomlins may refer to:

Sir Thomas Edlyne Tomlins (1762–1841) was an English legal writer.

Thomas Edlyne Tomlins (1804–1872) was an English legal writer.

Keith Patrick Tomlins is a former cricketer.

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1650 Year

1650 (MDCL) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1650th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 650th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1650, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1593 Year

1593 (MDXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1593rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 593rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 16th century, and the 4th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1593, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1712 Year

1712 (MDCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1712th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 712th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 18th century, and the 3rd year of the 1710s decade. As of the start of 1712, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it began as a leap year starting on Monday and remained so until Thursday, February 29. By adding a second leap day Sweden reverted to the Julian calendar and the rest of the year was in sync with the Julian calendar. Sweden finally made the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar in 1753. This year has 367 days.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1602.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1599.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1575.

Thomas Stanley (author) English author and translator

Sir Thomas Stanley was an English author and translator.

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature.

Chester and Cheshire (Constituencies) Act 1542

Chester and Cheshire (Constituencies) Act 1542 is the Act of Parliament allowing Cheshire to be represented in the Parliament of England. The county palatine of Chester, ruled by the earls of Chester was established by William the Conqueror. Cheshire had its own parliament, consisting of barons of the county, and was not represented in the parliament of England. After the passing of the act Cheshire retained some of its special privileges until 1830. The earldom of Chester is traditionally vested in the sovereign's eldest son upon his crowning as Prince of Wales.

Lancelot (Launcelot) Bulkeley was an English archbishop of Dublin.

Owen Ruffhead was a miscellaneous writer, and the descendant of a Welsh family who were bakers to King George I of Great Britain.

Elizabeth Sophia Tomlins (1763–1828), was born in 1763. In 1797 her brother, later Sir Thomas Edlyne Tomlins (1762–1841), published ‘Tributes of Affection by a Lady and her Brother’, a collection of short poems, most of them by her. Besides contributing several pieces to various periodical publications, she was the author of several novels, of which the most popular was ‘The Victim of Fancy,’ an imitation of Goethe's ‘Werther.’ Others were ‘The Baroness d'Alunton,’ and ‘Rosalind de Tracy,’ 1798, 12mo. She also translated the ‘History of Napoleon Bonaparte’ from one of the works of Louis Pierre Anquetil. Miss Tomlins died at The Firs, Cheltenham, on 8 August 1828.

Thomas Tomlins may refer to:

John Raithby (1766–1826), lawyer, born in 1766, was eldest son of Edmund Raithby of Edenham, Lincolnshire. On 26 January 1795 he was admitted a member of Lincoln's Inn, and was subsequently called to the bar. He practised in the Court of Chancery. His legal writings obtained for him a commissionership of bankruptcy; he was also nominated a sub-commissioner on the public records. Raithby died at the Grove, Highgate, on 31 August 1826, leaving a widow.

Richard Tomlins or Tomlyns was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1621 and 1629. He was made an honorary member of Lincoln’s Inn in 1625.

Richard Tomlins was an English judge who served as Baron of the Exchequer during the Interregnum.

Richard Tomlins may refer to:

Richard Tomlins (merchant) merchant

Richard Tomlins or Tomlyns (?1564–1650) was an English merchant resident in the City of Westminster who funded the first studies in anatomy at Oxford University..