Tommy Broad

Last updated

Tommy Broad
Personal information
Full nameThomas Higginson Broad
Date of birth(1887-07-31)31 July 1887
Place of birth Stalybridge, England
Date of death October qtr. 1966 (aged 79)
Place of death Barton-upon-Irwell, England
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Playing position(s) Outside-right
Youth career
Redgate Albion
Denton Wanderers
Openshaw Lads Club
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1905–1908 West Bromwich Albion 11 (0)
1908–1909 Chesterfield 48 (5)
1909–1912 Oldham Athletic 134 (12)
1912–1919 Bristol City 106 (8)
1919–1921 Manchester City 42 (0)
1921–1924 Stoke 83 (4)
1924–1925 Southampton 9 (0)
1925–1926 Weymouth
1926–???? Rhyl
Total433(29)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Thomas Higginson Broad (31 July 1887 – 1966) was an English footballer who played in the Football League for Bristol City, Chesterfield, Manchester City, Oldham Athletic, Southampton, Stoke and West Bromwich Albion. [1] His brother Jimmy was also a footballer.

Contents

Football career

Broad was born in Stalybridge and after playing youth football with various clubs, he had an unsuccessful trial with Manchester City in 1904. [2] In September 1905, he signed his first professional contract with West Bromwich Albion where he made 14 league and cup appearances before joining Chesterfield in February 1908.

Broad remained at Saltergate until the end of the 1908–09 season, at the end of which the "Spireites" were relegated to the Third Division. Broad then returned to his native Lancashire, joining Oldham Athletic in May 1909. At the end of Broad's first season at Boundary Park, the "Latics" were promoted to the First Division as runners-up to Manchester City. After three years with Oldham, during which he made over 140 first-team appearances, Broad was on the move again, this time back to the Second Division with Bristol City.

Broad remained with the Ashton Gate club until after the First World War, making over 110 appearances, [1] [3] [4] before again returning to Lancashire and the First Division, with Manchester City. Two years at Hyde Road were followed by three seasons at Stoke where Broad along with his brother Jimmy helped the "Potters" finish as Second Division runners-up in 1921–22, although this was followed by relegation the following season. [5] After three years in the Potteries, where Broad made 89 first-team appearances, he moved to the South Coast to join Southampton.

Broad still holds the distinction of being the oldest player ever signed by the "Saints", being just three weeks short of his 37th birthday. [2] At The Dell, he was used as cover for Bill Henderson and only had a run of three games in October, followed by six in April. [6] In September 1925, Broad moved to Weymouth of the Western League, before playing out his career with Rhyl. [2]

Career statistics

Source: [7]

ClubSeasonLeagueFA CupTotal
DivisionAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
West Bromwich Albion 1906–07 Second Division 11041151
Total11041151
Chesterfield 1907–08 Second Division10200102
1908–09 Second Division38320403
Total48520505
Oldham Athletic 1909–10 Second Division37710387
1910–11 First Division 23130261
1911–12 First Division36140401
Total969801049
Bristol City 1912–13 Second Division37310383
1913–14 Second Division38320403
1914–15 Second Division31220332
Total1068501118
Manchester City 1919–20 First Division19010200
1920–21 First Division23010240
Total42020440
Stoke 1921–22 Second Division32340363
1922–23 First Division21110221
1923–24 Second Division30010310
Total83460894
Southampton 1924–25 Second Division900090
Total900090
Career Total3952627142227

Honours

Oldham Athletic
Stoke

Related Research Articles

Harold Hadley was an English professional footballer and football manager. He played once for the England national side.

David Gort Burnside was an English footballer, who played as an attacking midfielder. He made a total of 405 appearances in the Football League for West Bromwich Albion, Southampton, Crystal Palace, Wolverhampton Wanderers, Plymouth Argyle, Bristol City and Colcester United. He then moved into non-league football becoming player-manager at Bath City and later became a youth trainer with England and briefly manager at Bristol City. He also made appearances for Los Angeles Wolves as a guest.

Wilfred Grant was an English professional footballer who played as a forward for Southampton, Cardiff City and Ipswich Town.

The 1973–74 season was the 75th completed season of The Football League.

The 1981–82 season was the 83rd completed season of The Football League.

William Murphy, often known as Spud Murphy, was an English footballer who played as a winger for Manchester City, Southampton, Oldham Athletic and Tranmere Rovers.

William Henry Light was an English footballer who played for Southampton and West Bromwich Albion as a goalkeeper in the 1930s.

John Thomas Robertson was a Scottish footballer who played at full-back around the turn of the 20th century for various clubs in England, including Stoke, Liverpool and Southampton.

John Christopher McDonald was an English footballer who played as an outside forward for various clubs in the 1940s and 1950s. During his spell at Fulham, he helped them claim the Football League Second Division championship title in 1949.

Reginald Herbert Watson was an English professional footballer who played as an outside-forward in the 1920s and 1930s, spending most of his career with Oldham Athletic, before playing for Southampton and Rochdale.

The 1946–47 Southampton F.C. season was the club's 18th season in the Football League Second Division and their 20th in the Football League. Southampton finished the season in 14th place in the league table, having won 15, drawn 9 and lost 18 of their 42 matches. The club also made it to the fourth round of the FA Cup. Inside forward Jack Bradley finished the season as the club's top scorer in the league with 14 goals, while centre forward George Lewis finished as joint top scorer in all competitions alongside Bradley, with 15 goals.

The 1923–24 season was the 29th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's second in the Second Division of the Football League. Having finished in a mid-table position the previous season, the club made progress towards their goal of promotion to the First Division by finishing fifth in the second flight in 1923–24. The campaign started off relatively poorly, as the club won just two of their opening ten fixtures and found themselves around the middle of the table again. However, the team's performances began to improve, and by the middle of January they had made it to the top five in the division. With tough competition at the higher end of the Second Division, Southampton continued to drop points in key matches and finished the season in fifth place with 17 wins, 14 draws and 11 losses.

The 1924–25 season was the 30th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's third in the Second Division of the Football League. Following the 1923–24 season, in which the club finished just three points shy of the First Division promotion places in fifth place, the Saints dropped two positions to finish seventh in the league. As with the last season, Southampton began their Second Division campaign poorly and found themselves at the bottom of the table after two losses in their first three games. The side continued to struggle to pick up wins, but steadily began making their way up the table over the next few months. A number of wins over the Christmas period and an eight-game unbeaten run at the end of the season helped Southampton finish in seventh place with 13 wins, 18 draws and 11 losses.

The 1925–26 season was the 31st season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's fourth in the Second Division of the Football League. After finishing in the top half of the league table in their first three seasons in the division, Southampton had their worst year to date in the second flight when they finished in 14th place, ending just six points above the first relegation position. The club suffered a string of losses at the beginning of the campaign, leaving them with points to make up in later months. Former player Arthur Chadwick was brought in as Southampton's new manager in October, and the club subsequently secured their position in the Second Division with a run of wins over the Christmas period, despite continuing to lose points. The club finished in 14th place with 15 wins, eight draws and 19 losses.

The 1927–28 season was the 33rd season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's sixth in the Second Division of the Football League. The season was the club's worst in the division to date, as they finished in 17th place just two points above Fulham in the first relegation spot. After a poor start in which they lost their first four games of the campaign, the Saints continued to drop points against teams throughout the Second Division, remaining in the bottom six positions for most of the year. A number of wins in the second half of the season over fellow mid-table sides helped to offset notable losses against those aiming for promotion, ensuring that the club avoided returning down to the Third Division South. Southampton finished the season in 17th place with 14 wins, seven draws and 21 losses.

The 1928–29 season was the 34th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's seventh in the Second Division of the Football League. After finishing in the bottom half of the Second Division league table the last three seasons, the club returned to challenging for promotion to the First Division when they finished fourth, their highest position in the league to date. The team were strong throughout the campaign, picking up key wins over teams around them in the table to secure a strong position. They stayed in the top six of the league for most of the campaign from September, reaching third place on two occasions and dropping to seventh just twice. Southampton finished the season in fourth place with 17 wins, 14 draws and 11 losses, five points behind Grimsby Town in the first promotion place.

The 1929–30 season was the 35th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's eighth in the Second Division of the Football League. After finishing fourth in the Second Division the previous season – their highest position in the league to date – Southampton continued their efforts towards achieving promotion to the First Division, but finished three places lower in seventh. The club struggled at the beginning of the league campaign, remaining in the bottom half of the table due to a run of poor results. A period of form including six wins in eight games followed between September and November, enabling the Saints to move up as high as third place. The team remained in the top half of the Second Division table for most of the rest of the season, finishing in seventh place with 17 wins, 11 draws and 14 losses.

The 1930–31 season was the 36th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's ninth in the Second Division of the Football League. After securing their place as a top-half side in the Second Division over the past two seasons, the Saints began to lose their footing on the league and dropped to ninth in the division. The club failed to win any of their first four games of the campaign, briefly struggling to stay above the two relegation places, but had soon made their way to the top half of the division where they remained for the rest of the season. The Saints were unable to challenge for promotion to the First Division, however, briefly reaching the top five but remaining a long way off the top two sides. Southampton finished the season in ninth place in the table with 19 wins, six draws and 17 losses.

The 1931–32 season was the 37th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's tenth in the Second Division of the Football League. After finishing in the top half of the Second Division league table for the past three seasons, the Saints struggled to challenge in 1931–32 and ended up finishing in 14th place, closer to relegation than promotion. Southampton's first season with manager George Kay started strongly, as the team picked up four wins in their first five matches and reached the top of the Second Division league table for the first time in the club's history. Form quickly deteriorated, however, and the club was briefly involved in a fight for survival in the new year. After picking up a few more wins, Southampton secured their safety and finished in 14th place with 14 wins, 14 draws and 14 losses.

The 1932–33 season was the 38th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's 11th in the Second Division of the Football League. It was another disappointing campaign for the Saints, who finished mid-table and rarely competed for promotion to the First Division. After a slow start to the season, the club had established themselves in the top half of the table by October with a string of victories. By the end of the calendar year, Southampton had dropped as low as 14th in the Second Division table – the position in which they finished the previous season – after a period of poor form in December. Wins were hard to come by in the second half of the season, but a strong run of results in April meant that the side finished 12th with 18 wins, five draws and 19 losses, seven points above the first relegation place.

References

  1. 1 2 Joyce, Michael (2004). Football League Players' Records 1888 – 1939. Tony Brown. ISBN   1-899468-67-6.
  2. 1 2 3 Holley, Duncan; Chalk, Gary (1992). The Alphabet of the Saints. ACL & Polar Publishing. p. 46. ISBN   0-9514862-3-3.
  3. Woods, David; Leigh Edwards (1997). Bristol City FC The First 100 years. Redcliffe Press. ISBN   1-900178-26-5.
  4. Woods, David (1994). Bristol Babe The First 100 years of Bristol City FC. Yore Publications. ISBN   1-874427-95-X.
  5. Matthews, Tony (1994). The Encyclopaedia of Stoke City. Lion Press. ISBN   0-9524151-0-0.
  6. Chalk, Gary; Holley, Duncan (1987). Saints – A complete record. Breedon Books. pp. 72–73. ISBN   0-907969-22-4.
  7. Tommy Broad at the English National Football Archive (subscription required)