Tommy Clarke

Last updated
Tommy Clarke
Tommy Clarke.jpg
Catcher
Born:(1888-05-09)May 9, 1888
New York, New York
Died: August 14, 1945(1945-08-14) (aged 57)
Corona, New York
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
August 26, 1909, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
August 21, 1918, for the Chicago Cubs
MLB statistics
Batting average .265
Home runs 6
Runs batted in 191
Teams
As player

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Thomas Aloysius Clarke (May 9, 1888 in New York, New York – August 14, 1945 in Corona, New York), was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1909 through 1918 for the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds. He also served as a coach on the 1933 World Championship Giants team.

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