Tommy Harris (rugby)

Last updated

Tommy Harris
Thomas Harris - Hull.jpeg
Personal information
Full namePercival Thomas Harris
Born5 June 1927
Crumlin, Wales
Died27 September 2006(2006-09-27) (aged 79)
York, England
Playing information
Rugby union
Position hooker
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
19??–49 Newbridge
Rugby league
Position Hooker
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1950–62 Hull F.C. 4445620172
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1952–59 Wales 82006
1954–60 Great Britain 252006
1954–58 GB tour games 2290015
1954 GB tour trial 10000
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
1962 York
Source: [1]

[2]

Percival Thomas Harris (5 June 1927 – 27 September 2006), also known by the nickname of "Bomber", [3] was a Welsh rugby union and World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s, and coached rugby league in the 1960s and 1970s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Newbridge RFC, as a hooker, and representative rugby league (RL) for Great Britain winning the 1960 Rugby League World Cup and Wales, and at club level for Hull F.C. winning the 1960 Lance Todd Trophy, as a hooker, [1] he remained at Hull F.C. for his entire playing career, ultimately becoming an inductee in the club's Hall of Fame, he also set the record for most test matches played for Great Britain of any hooker, [4] and coached at club level for York.

Contents

Background

Harris was born in Crumlin, in Monmouthshire, and he died aged 79 in York, North Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

In 1949 four players left the Newbridge club to play professional rugby league football in the 1949–50 Northern Rugby Football League season: Harris and Bill Hopkins [5] [6] to Hull FC, Granville James to Hunslet and Glyn Meredith to Wakefield Trinity. [7] He went on to gain selection to play international matches for Wales as well. Harris was selected to play for Great Britain in the inaugural Rugby League World Cup, the 1954 tournament.

Harris played hooker in Hull FC's 13-30 defeat by Wigan in the 1959 Challenge Cup Final during the 1958–59 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 9 May 1959, in front of a crowd of 79,811, [8] and played hooker, and was man of the match winning the Lance Todd Trophy in the 5-38 defeat by Wakefield Trinity in the 1959–60 Challenge Cup Final during the 1959–60 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 14 May 1960, in front of a crowd of 79,773. [9]

During the 1959–60 season the Australian national team toured Europe, and Harris was selected play for Great Britain against them. Harris played hooker in Hull FC's 14-15 defeat by Featherstone Rovers in the 1959 Yorkshire County Cup Final during at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 31 October 1959, in front of a crowd of 23,983. Later Harris played for Great Britain in the 1960 World Cup.

Harris played over 400 games for Hull FC, in the position of hooker, up to his retirement in 1962, when he became a coach of York.

Coaching career

Harris coached the York club for 11 years, [3] and was also a director of York Rugby League Football Club from 1966 until 1987.

Related Research Articles

Dean Trevor Busby is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1990s and 2000s. He played at representative level for England and Wales, and at club level for Hull F.C., St Helens and the Warrington Wolves, as a prop, second-row or loose forward, i.e. number 8 or 10, 11 or 12, or 13.

Roy Francis (rugby) Welsh RL coach and former GB & Wales international rugby league footballer

Roy Francis was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer and coach of the mid 20th century. He was the first Black British professional coach in any sport. Francis was also a highly accomplished player, scoring 229 tries in his 356 career games, chiefly as a wing. A Great Britain and Wales national representative three-quarter back, he played for English clubs Wigan, Barrow, Dewsbury, Warrington and Hull F.C. Francis then became a coach with Hull F.C. Renowned for his innovative coaching methods, he was regarded as a visionary, leading Hull to title success before going on to win the Challenge Cup with Leeds. He then broke further ground by moving on to coach in Australia with the North Sydney Bears before another brief stint at Leeds, and then Bradford Northern.

John William Whiteley MBE, born 20 November 1930 is an English World Cup winning former professional rugby league footballer, and coach. A Great Britain international representative forward, and later coach, he played his entire club football with Hull FC.

John H. Bridges, also known by the nickname of "Keith", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Featherstone Rovers, Bradford Northern and Hull F.C., as an occasional goal-kicking hooker, i.e. number 9, during the era of contested scrums.

Vince Farrar English RL coach and former GB & England international rugby league footballer

Vincent "Vince" Farrar was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Featherstone Rovers (captain), Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks, Hull F.C. and the Sheffield Eagles (captain), as a prop, hooker or loose forward, i.e. number 8 or 10, 9, or 13, during the era of contested scrums, was captain of Hull during the 1978–79 season and 1979–80 season, and coached at club level for Featherstone Rovers.

Len Casey, also known by the nickname of "Cast Iron Casey", is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Hull Kingston Rovers, Bradford Northern, Hull F.C. and Wakefield Trinity, as a prop, second-row or loose forward, and coached at club level for Wakefield Trinity, Hull FC, Beverley A.R.L.F.C. and the Scarborough Pirates.

S. John Shaw, also known by the nickname of "Joby", was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity, and Halifax, as a hooker, i.e. number 9, during the era of contested scrums

Lee Crooks is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s, and coached in the 1990s, 2000s and 2010s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Hull FC, Western Suburbs Magpies, Balmain Tigers, Leeds and Castleford, as a prop or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, captain of Hull during the 1985–86 and 1986–87 seasons, and coached at representative level for Serbia, and at club level for Keighley and York.

Robin "Bob" Coverdale, also known by the nickname of "The Mayor of Dunswell", was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Hull FC, Wakefield Trinity, and Hull Kingston Rovers, as a prop, i.e. number 8 or 10, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for Beverley A.R.L.F.C..

James "Jim" Gerald Drake was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative for Great Britain, English League XIII and Cumberland, and at club level for Heworth ARLFC, Hull FC and Hull Kingston Rovers, as a fullback, prop, second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 1, 8 or 10, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

William "Bill" D. Drake was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Cumberland, and at club level for Heworth A.R.L.F.C., Hull FC, Leeds and York as a back, and later a forward, during the era of contested scrums.

Michael "Mick"/"Mike" Harrison is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Hull F.C., and Leeds, as a centre, or prop, i.e. number 3 or 4, or, 8 or 10, during the era of contested scrums.

Arthur Keegan, also known by the nickname of "Ollie", was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for West Town Boys ARLFC, Hull F.C., Bramley and Batley, as a goal-kicking fullback, i.e. number 1, and was captain of Hull during the 1965–66, 1966–67, 1967–68, 1968–69, 1969–70 and 1970–71 seasons, and coached at representative level for Yorkshire, and at club level for Bramley, after serving in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment.

Billy Stone (rugby) GB & England international rugby league footballer

William J. Stone was an English rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s and 1920s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Hull FC, as a three-quarter back. He was captain of Hull during the 1921–22 and 1922–23 seasons.

Charles Booth was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s and 1940s. He played at representative level for England and British Empire, and at club level for Hull FC, and Oldham RLFC as a WW2 guest player, as a hooker, or second-row, i.e. number 9, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums, and was captain of Hull during the 1945–46 season.

Michael "Mick"/"Mike" Scott was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for England, and at club level for Hull FC and Rochdale Hornets as a prop, or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums, and was captain of Hull during the 1955–56 season and 1956–57 season, and deputised in the 1962–63 season as Johnny Whiteley missed entire season through injury.

Edward "Ted" Tattersfield was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s and 1940s, and coached in the 1940s. He played at representative level for England, and at club level for Reckitt ARLFC, Hull Kingston Rovers, Leeds (captain), Halifax, Batley and Hull F.C., as an occasional goal-kicking second-row or loose forward, i.e. number 11 or 12, or, 13, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for Hull F.C. and the Hull Dockers. Ted Tattersfield was a Corporal in the British Army during World War II.

Granville James is a Welsh former rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Newbridge RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales and Other Nationalities, and at club level for Hunslet, as a loose forward, i.e. number 13, during the era of contested scrums.

George Oliver was a Welsh dual-code international rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s and 1920s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales, and at club level for Talywain RFC, Pill Harriers RFC and Pontypool RFC, as a lock, i.e. number 4 or 5, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales and Monmouthshire, and at club level for Hull F.C. and Pontypridd, as a prop, or hooker, i.e. number 8 or 10, or 9, during the era of contested scrums.

Tony Dean was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached in the 1980s. He played at club level for Castleford, Batley, Hunslet and Hull FC, as a scrum-half, or loose forward, i.e. number 7, or 13, and coached at club level for Wakefield Trinity and Hull F.C..

References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. Gone North Volume 1 by Robert Gate page 72 ISBN   0951119001
  3. 1 2 "Profile at hullfc.com (archived by web.archive.org)". hullfc.com. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  4. "Great Britain Hooker Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. Past players at hullfc.com
  6. Bill Hopkins at hullfc.com
  7. "Percival Thomas Harris". Yorkshire Post. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. "1958-1959 Challenge Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  9. "A complete history of Hull FC's Challenge Cup finals". Hull Daily Mail. 22 August 2013. Archived from the original on 3 February 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.