Tommy Heath (baseball)

Last updated
Tommy Heath
Catcher
Born:(1913-08-13)August 13, 1913
Akron, Colorado
Died: February 26, 1967(1967-02-26) (aged 53)
Los Gatos, California
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 23, 1935, for the  St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
September 18, 1938, for the  St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average .230
Home runs 3
Runs batted in 34
Teams

Thomas George Heath (August 3, 1913 – February 26, 1967) was an American catcher and scout in Major League Baseball and a manager in minor league baseball. He played in parts of three seasons in the majors between 1935 and 1938, all for the St. Louis Browns. Heath stood 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and weighed 185 pounds (84 kg) during his playing days.

Heath's Major League career was spent with the Browns (1935; 1937–38), where he played 134 total games, compiling a batting average of .230 in 330 at bats with three home runs and 34 runs batted in. He was somewhat better known for his 18-year career as a minor league manager (1947–64), where he principally worked in the New York Giants and Los Angeles Angels farm systems, and in between piloted four Pacific Coast League clubs between 1952 and 1961. As the leader of the Giants' Minneapolis Millers Triple-A affiliate (1949–51), he managed future major leaguers such as Willie Mays and Hoyt Wilhelm — both members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1948, he managed the Trenton Giants to the Interstate League championship, the only title he won during his managerial career.

Heath served as a scout for the Angels after his managing career ended. He died at age 53 in Los Gatos, California.

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