Tommy Howley

Last updated

Thomas Howley
Personal information
Full nameThomas Howley
Bornunknown
Diedunknown
Playing information
Rugby union
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
Ebbw Vale RFC
Rugby league
Position Wing, Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1920–26 Wigan 219101280359
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1921–25 Wales 40000
1924 Great Britain 62006
Source: [1]

Thomas "Tommy" Howley (birth unknown – death unknown) was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s and 1920s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Ebbw Vale RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Wigan, as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4. [2]

Contents

Playing career

International honours

Thomas Howley won 4 caps for Wales (RL) in 1921–1925 while at Wigan, and won caps for Great Britain (RL) while at Wigan in 1924 against Australia (3 matches), and New Zealand (3 matches). [1]

Championship Final appearances

Thomas Howley played right-centre, i.e. number 3, and scored a drop goal in Wigan's 13-2 victory over Oldham in the Championship Final during the 1921–22 season at The Cliff, Broughton on Saturday 6 May 1922, [3] and played right-centre, i.e. number 3, and scored a 2-tries in the 22-10 victory over Warrington in the Championship Final during the 1925–26 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Saturday 8 May 1926. [4]

County Cup Final appearances

Thomas Howley played left-centre, i.e. number 4, and scored a try in Wigan's 20–2 victory over Leigh in the 1922–23 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1922–23 season at The Willows, Salford on Saturday 25 November 1922, [5] and played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 11-15 defeat by Swinton in the 1925–26 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1925–26 season at The Cliff, Broughton on Wednesday 9 December 1925

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. pp. 108–114. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  3. "1921–1922 Championship Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  4. "1925-1926 Championship Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. "1922–1923 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.