Tommy Leigh

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Tommy Leigh
Tommy Leigh 1903.jpg
Leigh while with Brentford in 1903
Personal information
Full nameThomas Leigh [1]
Date of birth(1875-02-02)2 February 1875
Place of birth Derby, England [1]
Date of death 24 January 1914(1914-01-24) (aged 38)
Place of death Derby, England
Playing position(s) Centre forward
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1895 Derby County 0 (0)
1896–1898 Burton Swifts 73 (26)
1898–1899 New Brighton Tower 12 (4)
1899–1900 Newton Heath 43 (16)
1901–1903 New Brompton
1903–1904 Brentford 19 (1)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Thomas Leigh (2 February 1875 – 24 January 1914), commonly known as either Tom or Tommy Leigh, was an English professional footballer who played as a centre-forward. [1] Born in Derby, he played in the Football League for New Brighton Tower, Burton Swifts and Newton Heath. [1] He also played in the Southern League for New Brompton and Brentford. [2]

Contents

Career statistics

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
ClubSeasonLeagueFA CupTotal
DivisionAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
Newton Heath 1899–1900 [3] Second Division 910091
1900–01 [3] 3415303715
Total4316304616
Brentford 1903–04 [2] Southern League First Division19153244
Career total6217837020

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Joyce, Michael (2012). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939. Nottingham: Tony Brown. p. 172. ISBN   190589161X.
  2. 1 2 White, Eric, ed. (1989). 100 Years of Brentford. Brentford FC. p. 357. ISBN   0951526200.
  3. 1 2 "Thomas Leigh". 11v11.com. Retrieved 15 March 2018.