Tommy Milner (rugby league)

Last updated

Thomas Milner
Personal information
Full nameThomas Milner
Playing information
Position Stand-off
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1912–≥14 Dewsbury
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1914 England 11003
Source: [1] [2]

Thomas Milner (birth unknown – death unknown) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s. He played at representative level for England, and at club level for Dewsbury, as a stand-off. [1]

Contents

Playing career

International honours

Tommy Milner won a cap for England while at Dewsbury in 1914 against Wales. [2]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Tommy Milner played stand-off in Dewsbury's 8-5 victory over Oldham in the 1911–12 Challenge Cup Final during the 1911-12 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 27 April 1912 in front of a crowd of 16,000. [3] [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2012.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  3. "Ray French selects his top 10 Challenge Cup final shocks. No 6: 1912, Dewsbury 8-5 Oldham". bbc.co.uk. 27 February 2004. Retrieved 1 January 2005.
  4. Hoole, Les (1998). The Rugby League Challenge Cup – An Illustrated History. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-094-3