Tommy Noble

Last updated
Tommy Noble
Statistics
Weight(s) Bantamweight, featherweight
Height5 ft 5 in (165 cm)
NationalityBritish
Born(1897-03-04)4 March 1897
Died1 April 1966(1966-04-01) (aged 69)
Boxing record
Total fights181
Wins81
Wins by KO25
Losses66
Draws17
No contests15 (several no/unknown decision)

Tommy Noble (4 March 1897 – 1 April 1966) was a British boxer who was British bantamweight champion between 1918 and 1919, and European champion in 1919. He won the World featherweight title in 1920.

Boxing combat sport

Boxing is a combat sport in which two people, usually wearing protective gloves, throw punches at each other for a predetermined amount of time in a boxing ring.

Bantamweight is a weight class in combat sports.

Featherweight is a weight class in the combat sports of boxing, kickboxing, mixed martial arts, and Greco-Roman wrestling.

Contents

Career

Noble enlisted into the British Army when World War I broke out, but was discharged as medically unfit in January 1915. [1] He made his professional debut in February 1915 with a win over Jim Welsh. He fought 29 times in 1915, winning 23. His first fight of 1916 was a loss to Jimmy Wilde, and he was also beaten in April, and again in July, by Joe Symonds. [2] He had a run of success later in the year, beating Bill Ladbury twice, before five straight defeats to Johnny Hughes, Digger Stanley, Joe Fox, Wilde, [2] and Tancy Lee. He beat Hughes on points in November.

British Army land warfare branch of the British Armed Forces of the United Kingdom

The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2018, the British Army comprises just over 81,500 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 27,000 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Jimmy Wilde Wales boxer

William James Wilde was a Welsh professional boxer and world boxing champion. Often regarded as the greatest British fighter of all time, he was the first official world flyweight champion and was rated by American boxing writer Nat Fleischer, as well as many other professionals and fans including former boxer, trainer, manager and promoter, Charley 'Broadway' Rose, as "the Greatest Flyweight Boxer Ever". Wilde earned various nicknames such as, "The Mighty Atom," "Ghost with the Hammer in His Hand" and "The Tylorstown Terror" due to his bludgeoning punching power. While reigning as the world's greatest flyweight, Wilde would take on bantamweights and even featherweights, and knock them out. As well as his professional career, Wilde participated in 151 bouts judged as 'newspaper decisions', of these he boxed 70 rounds, won 7 and lost 1, with 143 being declared as 'no decisions'. Wilde has the longest recorded unbeaten streak in boxing history, having gone 104-0.

In 1917 he was called up under the Derby Scheme and served as a private in the Army Service Corps until being medically discharged again in November 1918. [1] [3]

Derby Scheme

The Derby Scheme was introduced during World War I in Britain in the autumn of 1915 by Herbert Kitchener's new Director General of Recruiting, Edward Stanley, 17th Earl of Derby (1865–1948), after which it was named. The scheme would demonstrate whether British manpower goals could be met by volunteers only, or if conscription was necessary.

Royal Army Service Corps

The Royal Army Service Corps (RASC) was a corps of the British Army responsible for land, coastal and lake transport, air despatch, barracks administration, the Army Fire Service, staffing headquarters' units, supply of food, water, fuel and domestic materials such as clothing, furniture and stationery and the supply of technical and military equipment. In 1965 its functions were divided between other Corps and the RASC ceased to exist; subsequently, in 1993, they in their turn became the "Forming Corps" of the Royal Logistic Corps.

In 1917 he beat Sid Smith, Nat Brooks, [4] and Freddie Jacks, but lost to Mike Honeyman, Louis Ruddick (twice), and Joe Conn. [5] A good run in the latter half of 1918, including a win over Curley Walker despite being a stone lighter, [6] led to his meeting Symonds in November at the National Sporting Club, for the British bantamweight title vacated by Fox. The fight went the full 20 rounds, with Noble taking the decision to become British champion. [3] [7]

Sid Smith (boxer) English boxer

Sid Smith was an English flyweight boxer. He was the first officially recognized British flyweight champion, and was also recognized by the International Boxing Union as the World flyweight champion.

Mike Honeyman was a British boxer who was British featherweight champion between 1920 and 1921.

Curley Walker was a British boxer who was British bantamweight champion between 1914 and 1915.

In April 1919 Noble successfully challenged for Eugène Criqui's European title at the Holborn Stadium, stopping the defending champion in the 19th round. [8] He defended the title two months later against Criqui, the fight ending in a draw. [9] Only three days after the Criqui fight, Noble lost the British title, retiring in the tenth round against Walter Ross. [10] [11] [12] A month later he faced former European champion Charles Ledoux in Paris, losing the European title via a tenth round knockout, with Noble protesting that he had got up before the count ended. [13]

Eugène Criqui French boxer

Eugène Criqui was a French boxer who held the World Featherweight title in 1923. After his death, he was added to the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Walter Ross was a Scottish boxer who was British bantamweight champion in 1919 and fought for the European title the same year.

Charles Ledoux French boxer

Charles Ledoux was a French bantamweight boxer who was active from 1909-1926. While never capturing a world title, Ledoux squared off against the best opposition available to him both nationally and internationally. During his career he faced the likes of Jim Driscoll, Georges Carpentier, Johnny Coulon, Kid Herman, Kid Williams, Eugène Criqui and Joe Lynch. Ledoux was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2014.

Noble spent most of 1920 fighting in the United States and Canada, where he faced Georges Papin, Jacks, and Al Shubert among over a dozen contests, most notably a win over Johnny Murray at Madison Square Garden in October that saw him win the World featherweight belt. [14] [15]

Madison Square Garden Multi-purpose indoor arena in New York City, New York, United States

Madison Square Garden, colloquially known as The Garden or in initials as MSG, is a multi-purpose indoor arena in New York City. Located in Midtown Manhattan between 7th and 8th Avenues from 31st to 33rd Streets, it is situated atop Pennsylvania Station. It is the fourth venue to bear the name "Madison Square Garden"; the first two were located on Madison Square, on East 26th Street and Madison Avenue, with the third Madison Square Garden (1925) further uptown at Eighth Avenue and 50th Street.

He spent 1921 fighting in Australia, with little success apart from a win over Victorian champion Bert Spargo. [16] [17]

Between 1922 and 1926 he had a second spell in the US and Canada, losing most of his fights. [18] [19] [20] On his return to England he lost his first three fights, to Johnny Curley and twice to Battling van Dijk, and retired from the ring. He returned in 1930, beating a handful of inexperienced boxers, before retiring for good in 1932, although he later boxed in exhibition bouts. [21] His career earnings from boxing were stated at £100,000. [1]

He went on to market his own brand of bath oils which he sold by mail order, and worked as a street trader. [1] In 1940 he was awarded £200 damages against the Daily Sketch and Sunday Graphic Ltd. after an article published in the Daily Sketch wrongly suggested that Noble should have served at the front during the war and may have bribed his superiors to be allowed to box. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Boxer Awarded £200 Damages" . Evening Despatch. 5 June 1940. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  2. 1 2 Roberts, James B. & Skutt, Alexander G. (2006) The Boxing Register: International Boxing Hall of Fame Official Record Book, McBooks Press, ISBN   978-1590131213, p. 243
  3. 1 2 "Boxing: The Bantam-Weight Championship" . Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. 26 November 1918. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  4. "Tommy Noble v Nat Brooks" . Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. 8 May 1917. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. "Yesterday's Boxing Results" . Daily Mirror. 16 October 1917. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. "Tommy Noble Wins on Points" . Dundee Courier. 16 July 1918. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. "Tommy Noble Wins Bantam-Weight Championship" . Dundee Courier. 26 November 1918. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. "Bantam Entente: Criqui Suffers For France", Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLVI, Issue 14896, 28 April 1919, p. 9. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via paperspast.natlib.govt.nz
  9. "Boxing in France" . Western Daily Press. 28 June 1919. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. Dartnell, Fred (1924) Seconds Out!, T. W. Laurie, Limited, p. 79
  11. "Ross Wins British Bantam Title", The New York Times , 1 July 1919
  12. "Return of Tommy Noble" . Dundee Courier. 27 November 1919. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. "Boxing" . The Cornishman. 6 August 1919. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  14. Morrison, Ian (1988) Boxing: The Records, Guinness, ISBN   978-0851123455, p. 59
  15. "British Boxer's Success in America" . Western Times. 11 October 1920. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  16. "Tommy Noble Beaten" . Sheffield Independent. 10 October 1921. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  17. "Tommy Noble's Success in Australia" . Dundee Evening Telegraph. 1 August 1921. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  18. "Tommy Noble Defeated" . Dundee Courier. 19 July 1922. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  19. "Tommy Noble Beaten" . Derby Daily Telegraph. 14 October 1924. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  20. "Tommy Noble Beaten" . Lincolnshire Echo. 18 June 1925. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.
  21. "Victoria Pier Attractions" . Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald. 8 July 1933. Retrieved 1 January 2016 via British Newspaper Archive.