Tommy O'Brien

Last updated
Tommy O'Brien
Outfielder
Born:(1918-12-19)December 19, 1918
Anniston, Alabama
Died: November 5, 1978(1978-11-05) (aged 59)
Anniston, Alabama
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 24, 1943, for the  Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
May 13, 1950, for the  Washington Senators
MLB statistics
Batting average .277
Home runs 8
Runs batted in 78
Teams

Thomas Edward O'Brien (December 19, 1918 – November 5, 1978) was an outfielder/third baseman in Major League Baseball, playing mainly as a right fielder for three different teams between the 1943 and 1950 seasons. Listed at 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m), 195 lb. O'Brien batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Anniston, Alabama.

Basically a line-drive hitter and a good fielding replacement, O'Brien entered the majors in 1943 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, playing for them three years before joining the Boston Red Sox (1949–1950) and Washington Senators (1950). His most productive season came in his rookie year, when he posted career-highs in batting average (.310), runs (35), extrabases (21), RBI (26) and games played (89).

In a five-season career, O'Brien was a .277 hitter (198-for-714) with eight home runs and 78 RBI in 293 games, including 110 runs, 30 doubles, 14 triples, two stolen bases, and a .344 on-base percentage.

O'Brien died in his hometown of Anniston, Alabama, at the age of 59.


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