Tommy Parker (rugby league)

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Thomas Parker
Personal information
Full nameThomas Parker
Born(1901-05-22)22 May 1901
Cwmafan, Wales
Died17 April 1969(1969-04-17) (aged 67)
Cwmafan, Wales
Playing information
Position Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1923–31 Wigan 24111300339
1935–37 Côte basque XIII
Total24111300339
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1927 Glamorgan ≥1
1928–30 Wales 2
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
193538 Côte basque XIII
193839 Albi
Total0000
Source: [1]

Thomas Parker (birth unknown – death unknown) was a Welsh professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s. He played at representative level for Wales and Glamorgan, and at club level for Wigan, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4. [1] [2] [3]

Contents

Playing career

International honours

Tommy Parker won 2 caps for Wales in 1928–1930 while at Wigan. [1]

County honours

Tommy Parker played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in Glamorgan's 18-14 victory over Monmouthshire in the non-County Championship match during the 1926–27 season at Taff Vale Park, Pontypridd on Saturday 30 April 1927. [4]

Championship Final appearances

Tommy Parker played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in Wigan's 22-10 victory over Warrington in the Championship Final during the 1925–26 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Saturday 8 May 1926. [5]

County Cup Final appearances

Tommy Parker played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in Wigan's 5-4 victory over Widnes in the 1928–29 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1928–29 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 24 November 1928. [6]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. pp. 108–114. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  3. "Statistics at rugbyleague.wales". rugbyleague.wales. 31 December 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2020.
  4. Irvin Saxton (publish date tbc) "History of Rugby League – № 32 – 1926–27". Rugby Leaguer ISBN n/a
  5. "1925-1926 Championship Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  6. "1928–1929 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.