Tommy Peoples

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Tommy Peoples, performing in September 2009 Tp1web.jpg
Tommy Peoples, performing in September 2009

Tommy Peoples (20 September 1948 – 4 August 2018) was an Irish fiddler who played in the Donegal fiddle tradition.

Contents

Biography

Peoples was born near St. Johnston, County Donegal, Ireland. He was a member of traditional Irish music groups, including The Bothy Band as well as performing solo from the late 1960s. He played in the fiddle style of East Donegal. After moving to Dublin in the 1960s, where he was employed as a Garda (member of the Irish police force), he subsequently moved to County Clare and married Mary Linnane (daughter of Kitty Linnane, long-time leader of the Kilfenora Céilí Band). The family lived in St Johnston. His daughter, Siobhán Peoples, is also a fiddler.

Peoples was the Traditional Musician In Residence at The Balor Arts Centre, Ballybofey, County Donegal. In July 2015, he launched a self-published book, Ó Am go hAm - From Time to Time. The book combines a fiddle tutor by Peoples, along with illustrations and a complete notation of 130 original tunes by Peoples. The book also includes many stories and incidents from his life and musical career. He died on 4 August 2018, aged 70. [1]

Discography

With The Bothy Band

Solo

With Matt Molloy and Paul Brady

With Paul Brady

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