Tommy Rees (rugby)

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Tommy Rees
Birth nameThomas Edgar Rees
Date of birth(1904-08-22)22 August 1904
Place of birth Pontyclun, Wales
Date of death10 November 1968(1968-11-10) (aged 64)
Place of death Oldham, England
Rugby league career
Position(s) Fullback
Senior career
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1928-39
1939-?
Oldham
Broughton Rangers
1342
117
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1929 Great Britain 1 (0)
Rugby union career
Position(s) Fullback
Amateur team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
?
?
?
?-1928
Pontyclun RFC
Crawshays RFC
Army XV
London Welsh RFC
()
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1926-28 Wales 4 (4)

Thomas "Tommy" Edgar Rees (22 August 190410 November 1968 [1] ) was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales, and at club level for Pontyclun RFC, Crawshays RFC, Army XV and London Welsh RFC, as a fullback, i.e. number 15, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, and at club level for Oldham and Broughton Rangers as a fullback, i.e. number 1.

Contents

Background

Tommy Rees was born in Pontyclun, Wales, and he died aged 64 in Oldham, Lancashire, England.

Rugby union career

Rees was born in Pontyclun in South Wales and as a teenager played rugby for local club team Pontyclun RFC. [2] Jack Meggins, a local headmaster from Talbot Green, saw potential in Rees and recommended him in writing to invitational team Crawshays. Crawshays accepted Rees, the first notable team in his career. [2] Rees joined the British Army and became a soldier in the Welsh Guards, and while serving in the Guards he was selected for the Army XV.

In 1926, Rees was playing for Welsh exile team London Welsh, and after an excellent victory against Cross Keys at Blackheath on 6 March, Rees along with teammates Windsor Lewis and Wick Powell, was selected to face Ireland as part of the 1926 Five Nations Championship. [3] The game was played at St. Helen's, Swansea, with the Welsh team being led by Swansea's Rowe Harding. The Wales team were victorious over Ireland, robbing the Irish of both the Triple Crown and Grand Slam. Rees scored his first international points during the game with a single conversion, and at the end of the match, the three London Welsh players were carried from the pitch shoulder-high. The press recorded that Rees had "a great game that caused intense enthusiasm". [3] Rees was reselected for the next Wales international, the final game of the 1926 tournament, away to France. Now captained by Bobby Delahay, Wales won the game 7-5.

On Christmas Eve 1926, Rees was playing for London Welsh away to Cross Keys. In the first few minutes of the second half, while attempting a tackle, Rees broke his leg. [4] Rees had been a certainty for the 1927 Championship, and after his injury his place was taken by Ossie Male. The next season, Rees was back in the Wales team, and was chosen to face the New South Wales Waratahs at the Cardiff Arms Park. Wales were well beaten, though Rees scored for Wales with another conversion. The selectors kept faith with Rees, and he played his final union international in the opening game of the 1928 tournament, played at Swansea against England.

International matches played

Wales (rugby union) [5]

Rugby league career

He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Oldham and Broughton Rangers, as a fullback, i.e. number 1. In 1928 while only 23, Rees decide to switch to the professional league code, and 'Went North', joining Oldham RLFC. Rees had an eleven-year career with Oldham setting many club records, including kicking 668 goals and playing 121 consecutive first team games. [6] In 1939, towards the end of his club career, Rees joined Broughton Rangers though the outbreak of the Second World War ended the playing of professional rugby. He continued to be involved in rugby after his retirement, becoming a rugby league referee. In 1947 he became a rugby league referee and later ran the line as a touch judge in the final of the Rugby League Challenge Cup at Wembley. [6] He was a lifelong committee man, and served Oldham until ill-health forced his retirement. Tommy Rees is one of less than twenty-five Welshmen to have scored more than 1000-points in their rugby league career. [7] Tom Rees won a single cap for Great Britain while at Oldham in 1929 against Australia. [8]

Bibliography

Related Research Articles

Thomas Rees may refer to:

Pontyclun RFC Welsh rugby union team

Pontyclun Rugby Football Club is a Welsh rugby union team based in Pontyclun, Wales. Pontyclun RFC is a member of the Welsh Rugby Union and is a feeder club for the Cardiff Blues.

Rowe Harding Welsh rugby union player

W. Rowe Harding was a Welsh international rugby union wing who played club rugby for Swansea. An intelligent player, Harding played for several teams at club and international level. In 1926 he attended Cambridge University and played for Cambridge in a varsity match. Rowe retired from rugby at the age of 28 when he was called to the bar, and would later become a Circuit Court judge in 1953. Harding spent his later life connected with all manner of sports. He was Welsh Rugby Union vice-president from 1953–56, chairman and president of Glamorgan County Cricket Club, president of Swansea Lawn Tennis and Squash Rackets Club and patron of Cwmgors RFC.

Joseph Rees was a Welsh international rugby union full-back who played club rugby for Swansea. Rees made his debut for Swansea in 1919 and captained his club in the 1922/23 season. Rees would play 12 times for Wales, and captained them on one occasion. His brother, William "Billo" Rees, was a rugby league footballer who played for Wales and the Great Britain team, and toured Australia.

Evan James (rugby) Welsh rugby union and rugby league footballer

Evan James was a Welsh rugby half back who played club rugby for Swansea under the rugby union code, and professional rugby league for Broughton Rangers. While playing with Swansea, James was paired with his brother, David, and together they were nicknamed the 'Swansea gems' and the 'Curly haired marmosets'. The brothers were the centre of a controversial move to the league game in 1892 and switched codes twice in their careers.

Doug Phillips (rugby) Welsh rugby union and rugby league footballer

Douglas Versailles Phillips was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played representative level rugby union for Glamorgan, and at club level for Swansea RFC. Having switched codes to rugby league he played representative level rugby league for Great Britain and Wales; and at club level for Oldham and Belle Vue Rangers, as a second-row.

Percy Coldrick Welsh rugby union and rugby league footballer

Albert Percival "Percy" Coldrick was a Welsh dual code rugby player who played rugby union for Newport and rugby league for Wigan. He represented Wales under the union code and Wales and Great Britain under league rules.

David 'Dai' Gwynn was a Welsh international rugby union wing who played club rugby for Swansea, and county rugby for Lancashire. Gwynn played for Wales on six occasions and was the brother of William Gwynn, who also played international rugby for Wales.

Joseph "Joe" Jones was a Welsh dual-code international rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales, and at club level for Ystradgynlais RFC and Swansea RFC, as a Centre, i.e. number 12 or 13, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Leeds and Wakefield Trinity, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4.

William McCutcheon Welsh rugby union and rugby league footballer

William 'Billy' McCutcheon was a Welsh international rugby wing who played club rugby in the union code for Swansea, and represented Oldham under the league code. McCutcheon was capped for the Wales national rugby union team seven times between 1891 and 1894. In 1893 he was a member of the first Welsh Triple Crown winning team.

William Rees (rugby) Welsh rugby union and rugby league footballer

William "Billo" Rees was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Amman United RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Swinton, as a stand-off, or scrum-half, i.e. number 6, or 7.

Alfred "Alf" Ernest Wood was an English dual-code international rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1900s, 1910s and 1920s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for England, and at club level for Gloucester RFC, as a fullback, i.e. number 15, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, and at club level for Oldham, as a fullback, i.e. number 1.

Frank Young (rugby) Welsh rugby league and rugby union player

Frank 'Bucket' H. Young was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1900s and 1910s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Glamorgan, and at club level for Cardiff RFC, London Welsh RFC and Bristol Rugby, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Leeds, as a fullback, i.e. number 1.

Evan Davies was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s and 1920s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Llanelli RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Oldham, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4.

Thomas "Tom" Llewellyn was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1900s and 1910s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Whitchurch RFC and Treherbert RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Leeds, Yorkshire and Oldham, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4.

Thomas "Tommy" Howley was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s and 1920s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Ebbw Vale RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Wales, and at club level for Wigan, as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4.

Clifford G. Williams was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Monmouthshire County RFC, at invitational level for Crawshays RFC, and at for club level Hafodyrynys RFC, Cross Keys RFC (captain), and Newport RFC, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 9, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Hunslet, Batley, and Swinton, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7.

Thomas Harry Royal was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, and coached rugby league in the 1940s and 1950s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Welsh Schoolboys, and Glamorgan County RFC, and at club level for Blaengarw RFC, and Bridgend RFC, and he played representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Huddersfield, Dewsbury (captain), and Batley (captain), as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached club level rugby league (RL) for Batley.

Stuart Ferguson is a rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales XV, and at club level for Swansea RFC, as a Wing, i.e. number 11 or 14, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Leigh, as a goal-kicking fullback, or wing, i.e. number 1, or 2 or 5.

Evan Bevan Rees was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s and 1920s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales, and at club level for Swansea RFC, as a centre, i.e. number 12 or 13, and club level rugby league (RL) for Dewsbury and Batley.

References

  1. Tommy Rees rugby union player profile Scrum.com
  2. 1 2 David (1987), pg 37.
  3. 1 2 Jones (1985), pg 81.
  4. Jones (1985), pg 83.
  5. Smith (1980), pg 471.
  6. 1 2 David (1987), pg 38.
  7. Robert Gate (1988). "Gone North - Volume 2". R. E. Gate. ISBN   0-9511190-3-6
  8. "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2008. Retrieved 1 January 2009.