Tommy Spicer (footballer)

Last updated

Tommy Spicer
Tommy Spicer.jpg
Spicer while with Brentford in 1902
Personal information
Full nameThomas Ashby Spicer [1]
Date of birth June 1876
Place of birth Brighton, England
Date of death January 1958 (1958-02) (aged 81)
Place of death Ealing, England
Playing position(s) Goalkeeper
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
Silver Star
Sheppey United
1898–1900 Brighton United
1900–1901 Woolwich Arsenal 4 (0)
1901–1904 Brentford 51 (0)
1904–1905 Leyton
1905–1906 Brentford 4 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Thomas Ashby Spicer (June 1876 – January 1958) was an English professional football goalkeeper who appeared in the Football League for Woolwich Arsenal. [1] [2] [3]

Career statistics

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
ClubSeasonLeagueFA CupOtherTotal
DivisionAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
Woolwich Arsenal 1899–00 [4] Second Division 200020
1900–01 [4] 200020
Total400040
Brentford 1901–02 [3] Southern League First Division21030240
1902–03 [3] 150001 [lower-alpha 1] 0160
1903–04 [3] 15000150
Total5103010550
Brentford 1905–06 [3] Southern League First Division400040
Brentford total5503010590
Career total5903010630
  1. Appearance in Southern League promotion-relegation test match

Related Research Articles

Stewart Mackie Houston is a Scottish former football player and coach who played as a left-back. Born in Dunoon, he began his professional career in 1967 with Chelsea, before moving across London to Brentford in 1972. After 18 months with Brentford, he joined Manchester United, where he spent seven years, making 250 appearances. He then spent three years with Sheffield United, and another three with Colchester United to end his career. He also made one appearance for the Scotland national team in 1975.

Tommy Shanks Irish association football player

Thomas Shanks was an Irish footballer.

David Jenkins (footballer) British footballer

David John Jenkins is an English retired professional football forward who played in the Football League, most notably for Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur.

Arthur Shaw was an English professional footballer who played as a wing half in the Football League for Brentford, Arsenal and Watford.

Chuba Akpom English association football player

Chuba Amechi Akpom is an English professional footballer who plays as a striker for Greek club PAOK. He has represented England at youth international levels.

Thomas Grieve was a professional football outside right who played in the Football League for Woolwich Arsenal.

Stephen J. Stonley was an English professional football centre forward who played in the Football League for Woolwich Arsenal. He also played in the Southern League for Northampton Town and Brentford.

During the 1995–96 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Second Division. Despite spending over two months in the relegation places, the club achieved a mid-table finish in the league. A bright spot was a run to the fourth round of the FA Cup, falling to First Division high-flyers Charlton Athletic.

During the 1927–28 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South. A season of transition saw the Bees finish in mid-table and score 76 goals, which was at that time the club's best goalscoring tally since joining the Football League in 1920.

During the 1930–31 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South. Despite failing to challenge for promotion, the Bees finished in 3rd place and advanced to the fourth round of the FA Cup for the first time in four years.

During the 1932–33 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South and won the division title to secure promotion to the second tier of English football for the first time in the club's history. Jack Holliday set a new club goalscoring record of 39 goals in a season, which as of 2016 has yet to be broken. It is statistically Brentford's second-best season, after 1929–30.

During the 1935–36 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League First Division for the first time in the club's history. A torrid run in the opening half of the season left Brentford in the relegation places, but after a number of key signings were made, just two defeats from Christmas Day 1935 through to the end of the season elevated the Bees to an impressive 5th-place finish, the club's highest-ever in the league pyramid. Brentford also reached the final of the London Challenge Cup for the second consecutive season, but were beaten by league rivals Arsenal. In 2013, the Brentford supporters voted 1935–36 as the club's third-best season.

During the 1937–38 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League First Division. In the league, the Bees matched the previous season's finish of 6th and advanced to the 6th round of the FA Cup for the first time in club history. In 2013, the Brentford supporters voted 1937–38 as the club's second-best season.

During the 1911–12 English football season, Brentford competed in the Southern League First Division. A forgettable season saw the club finish in mid-table and advance to the first round proper of the FA Cup.

During the 1947–48 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Second Division. In the Bees' first second-tier season since 1934–35, the club slumped to a 15th-place finish.

During the 1943–44 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League South, due to the cessation of competitive football for the duration of the Second World War. The Bees marginally improved on the previous season's 9th-place finish, ending in 7th.

During the 1918–19 English football season, Brentford competed in the London Combination, due to the cessation of competitive football for the duration of the First World War. Buoyed by larger crowds after the Armistice, Brentford finished the season as champions of the London Combination.

During the 1953–54 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Second Division. With Brentford in the relegation places, player-manager Tommy Lawton transferred out of the club in September 1953 and his replacement Bill Dodgin Sr. was unable to turn things round, which culminated in relegation to the Third Division South on the final day of the season. Brentford would not play again in the second-tier of English football until the 1992–93 season.

During the 1954–55 English football season, Brentford competed in the Football League Third Division South. In the club's first season back in the third-tier since 1932–33, the Bees finished in mid-table. The campaign was memorable for the debuts of youth products Jim Towers and George Francis, who would dominate Brentford's goalscoring charts until 1961.

During the 1902–03 English football season, Brentford competed in the Southern League First Division. An appalling season led to a bottom-place finish in the First Division, but the Bees retained their First Division status with a victory over Second Division champions Fulham in a promotion-relegation test match.

References

  1. 1 2 Joyce, Michael (2012). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939. Nottingham: Tony Brown. p. 274. ISBN   190589161X.
  2. "Thomas Spicer | Arsenal.com". www.arsenal.com. Retrieved 31 July 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 White, Eric, ed. (1989). 100 Years Of Brentford. Brentford FC. pp. 356–358. ISBN   0951526200.
  4. 1 2 "Thomas Ashley Spicer". 11v11.com. Retrieved 23 December 2016.