Tommy Talton

Last updated
Tommy Talton
Born (1949-01-09) January 9, 1949 (age 72)
Orlando, Florida, United States
Genres Country rock, jam, Americana, Southern rock
Occupation(s)Musician
InstrumentsElectric and Acoustic Guitar
Years active1966–present
Labels Capricorn, RCA, HittinTheNote Records, Tommy Talton Music
Website www.tommytaltonmusic.com

Tommy Talton is an American guitarist who is most noted for having played with Cowboy, Gregg Allman, and numerous recording sessions with Paul Butterfield, Allman Brothers Band, Bonnie Bramlett, Clarence Carter, Corky Laing, Billy Joe Shaver, Dickey Betts, Kitty Wells, Martin Mull, Johnny Rivers, and We The People. He has released six solo albums from 2005 to the present; Someone Else's Shoes, Live Notes From Athens, Let's Get Outta Here, Until After Then, Somewhere South of Eden and Distant Light (Live Acoustic) plus Live At The NuttHouse, a collaborative album with his Cowboy co-leader Scott Boyer.

Biography

In the 1950s, Tommy Talton was exposed to Elvis Presley. When he was eight, Talton became interested in the guitar when he saw an instrument owned by one of his uncles and plucked one of the strings. [1] Talton ultimately learned to play the instrument when he was 13. In 1966, Talton joined We the People, and left the group when he was 18. In 1969, Talton met up with Scott Boyer, Chuck Leavell, and Bill Stewart in California and form the band Cowboy. Talton had been close friends with guitarist Duane Allman [2] and went on to play with Gregg Allman on his first tour as a solo artist as well as acoustic guitar on the Allman Brothers Band song "Pony Boy" on their album, Brothers and Sisters . Talton also made an appearance on Dickey Betts' Highway Call .

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References

  1. Elder, Bruce. "Tommy Talton". Allmusic. Allmusic.
  2. Triebsch, Kevin. "Catching up with rock legend Tommy Talton". AXS. AXS.