Tommy Tatum

Last updated
Tommy Tatum
Center fielder
Born:(1919-07-16)July 16, 1919
Decatur, Texas
Died: November 7, 1989(1989-11-07) (aged 70)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
August 1, 1941, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1947, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average .258
Home runs 1
Runs batted in 17
Teams

V T "Tommy" Tatum (July 16, 1919 – November 7, 1989) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball who played with the Brooklyn Dodgers and Cincinnati Reds in 1941 and 1947. Born in Decatur, Texas, he served in the Army from 1942 to 1946 during World War II.

In 81 games over two major league seasons, Tatum posted a .258 batting average (50-for-194) with 20 runs, 1 home run and 17 RBI.

He was the manager of the Oklahoma City Indians from 1951 to 1955 after his playing career ended. He died at age 70 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.


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