Tommy Thomas (politician)

Last updated
T.D. Thomas
Ontario MPP
In office
1955–1963
Preceded byNew riding
Succeeded by Albert Walker
Constituency Oshawa
In office
1948–1955
Preceded by Thomas Kelso Creighton
Succeeded by Matthew Dymond
Constituency Ontario
Personal details
Born(1899-02-19)February 19, 1899
Cardiff, Wales
Died July 30, 1980(1980-07-30) (aged 81)
Oshawa, Ontario
Political party CCF, New Democrat
Spouse(s) Christine Murray
Occupation Automotive toolmaker

Thomas David "T.D." Thomas (February 19, 1899 – July 30, 1980) was a politician in Ontario, Canada. [1] He was a CCF member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. He represented the ridings of Ontario from 1948 to 1955, and Oshawa from 1955 to 1963.

Ontario Province of Canada

Ontario is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada and is located in east-central Canada. It is Canada's most populous province accounting for 38.3 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth-largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto, which is also Ontario's provincial capital.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, many near the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

Legislative Assembly of Ontario single house of Legislature of Ontario

The Legislative Assembly of Ontario is one of two components of the Legislature of Ontario, the other being the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. The Legislative Assembly is the second largest Canadian provincial deliberative assembly by number of members after the National Assembly of Quebec. The Assembly meets at the Ontario Legislative Building at Queen's Park in the provincial capital of Toronto.

Contents

Background

Thomas, who was known as "Tommy" or by his initials as "T.D. Thomas", was born in Cardiff, Wales in 1899. [2] [3] He emigrated to Canada in 1929 and worked for General Motors of Canada as a toolmaker.

Cardiff City & County in Wales

Cardiff is the capital of Wales, and its largest city. The eleventh-largest city in the United Kingdom, it is Wales's chief commercial centre, the base for most national cultural institutions and Welsh media, and the seat of the National Assembly for Wales. At the 2011 census, the unitary authority area population was estimated to be 346,090, and the wider urban area 479,000. Cardiff is a significant tourist centre and the most popular visitor destination in Wales with 21.3 million visitors in 2017. In 2011, Cardiff was ranked sixth in the world in National Geographic's alternative tourist destinations.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

He sat Board of Education of the Ontario County Township and was a director of the Oshawa General Hospital from 1952 to 1973. [3] His wife Christine served on Oshawa City Council and later as Mayor of Oshawa in 1961 and 1962, the city's first woman mayor. [4]

Oshawa City Council is the governing body of the city of Oshawa, Ontario. The council has 11 members, consisting of 10 councillors plus the mayor. Prior to 2018, city councillors were elected at large, with seven people elected as "regional and city" councillors who would serve on both city council and the Durham Region council, while three were elected solely as city councillors. In 2018, the city moved to a ward-based system, with five wards which each elect one city councillor and one "regional and city" councillor.

Politics

Thomas served on the East Whitby Township council and was elected reeve in 1946 and 1947. He ran as the CCF candidate in the 1948 provincial election in the riding of Ontario. He defeated Progressive Conservative incumbent Thomas Creighton by about 2,600 votes. [5] He was re-elected in 1951, 1955, and 1959. [6] [7] [8]

Ontario was a provincial riding in the Canadian province of Ontario. Called Ontario South until 1933, it was active from 1867 to 1975. For its entire existence, the riding contained parts of or all of Ontario County, a now-defunct county which comprised most, but not all, of the contemporary Regional Municipality of Durham, including the municipalities of Ajax, Oshawa, Pickering and Whitby. After 1955, however, a separate riding called Oshawa was created to serve the city of Oshawa, Ajax and parts of Pickering and Whitby, while the Ontario riding continued to serve the more rural areas in the county. In 1966 a new Ontario South was created to represent Ajax, Pickering and Whitby. The remainder of the riding was divided into the new ridings of Durham West, Durham East and Durham—York in 1975.

Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario political party in Ontario, Canada

The Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario, often shortened to Ontario PC Party, PC, or Conservatives, is a centre-right political party in Ontario, Canada. The party has been led by Premier Doug Ford since March 10, 2018.

In the 1963 election he ran under the banner of the new party as the New Democrat candidate. He was defeated by PC candidate Albert Walker by 683 votes. [9]

Ontario New Democratic Party political party in Ontario, Canada

The Ontario New Democratic Party is a social-democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. The Ontario NDP, led by Andrea Horwath since March 2009, currently forms the Official Opposition in Ontario following the 2018 general election. It is a provincial section of the federal New Democratic Party. It was formed in October 1961 from the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL).

Albert Victor "Ab" Walker was a Canadian politician, who represented Oshawa in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1963 to 1967 as a Progressive Conservative member.

Related Research Articles

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (Ontario Section)

The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation – The Farmer-Labor Party of Ontario, or more commonly known as the Ontario CCF, was a democratic socialist provincial political party in Ontario that existed from 1932 to 1961. It was the provincial wing of the federal Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF). The party had no leader in the beginning, and was governed by a provincial council and executive. The party's first Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) was elected by voters in the 1934 Ontario general election. In the 1937 general election, no CCF members were elected to the Ontario Legislature. In 1942, the party elected Toronto lawyer Ted Jolliffe as its first leader. He led the party to within a few seats of forming the government in the 1943 general election; instead, it formed the Official Opposition. In that election, the first two women were elected to the Ontario Legislature as CCFers: Agnes Macphail and Rae Luckock. The 1945 election was a setback, as the party lost most of its seats in the Legislature, including Jolliffe's seat. The party again became the Official Opposition after the 1948 general election, and defeated the Conservative premier George Drew in his seat, when Bill Temple unexpectedly won in the High Park constituency. The middle and late 1940s were the peak years for the Ontario CCF. After that time, its electoral performances were dismal, as it was reduced to a rump of two seats in the 1951 election, three seats in the 1955 election, and five seats in the 1959 election. Jolliffe stepped down as leader in 1953, and was replaced by Donald C. MacDonald.

Edward Carson "Eddie" Sargent was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1963 to 1987 who represented the central Ontario riding of Grey North and Grey-Bruce.

George Calvin Wardrope was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He served as a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1951 to 1967. He was a member of cabinet in the governments of Leslie Frost and John Robarts.

St. Andrew (provincial electoral district) Electoral district in Ontario

St. Andrew was a provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that was established to elect Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) and then Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs) to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.

Bellwoods

Bellwoods was a provincial riding in Ontario, Canada in the old City of Toronto's west-end. It was represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1926 until 1987, when it was abolished and redistributed into the Dovercourt, and Fort York districts.

Osias F. "Osie" Villeneuve was a longtime politician in Ontario, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario and the House of Commons of Canada, and was an elected representative almost continuously from the 1940s until his death.

York South was a provincial riding in Ontario, Canada, that was represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1926 to 1999.

Dovercourt (provincial electoral district)

Dovercourt was the name of a provincial riding in Ontario, Canada. It existed from the 1926 election to the 1999 election. When it was established, it bordered Brockton on to the west, York South to the north, and Bracondale on the east. Lake Ontario was its southern border for most of its existence. At its abolition in 1999, it consisted of that part of the city of Toronto bounded on the north by the former city limits, on the east by Bathurst Street, on the south by Bloor Street and on the west by the CN Railway and St. Clair Avenue. It was redistributed into Davenport, St. Paul's and Trinity—Spadina ridings.

Eglinton (provincial electoral district)

Eglinton was a provincial electoral district located in Toronto, Ontario. From 1926 until 1999 it elected members to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. At its abolishment in 1999 it consisted of the neighbourhoods of Davisville and Lawrence Park in the north end of the old city of Toronto. It was abolished into Eglinton—Lawrence, Don Valley West and St. Paul's.

John Arthur Fullerton was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1945 to 1963. He represented the riding of Algoma—Manitoulin.

Bracondale

Bracondale was a provincial electoral district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It was represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1926 to 1967. The constituency got its name from an old Toronto suburb called Bracondale, that was annexed by Toronto in 1909. Its most notable event was electing one of the first two women Members of the Provincial Parliament (MPP) to share the title "first-woman MPP" in 1943 when Rae Luckock was elected. In 1965, Bracondale's MPP, Joseph Gould, died in office sparking the final election held in the constituency. George Ben won the by-election, and became the constituency's last MPP. It was abolished for the 1967 Ontario provincial election, and redistributed into the Dovercourt and Bellwoods constituencies. As of 2012, the current electoral districts of Davenport, St. Paul's and Trinity–Spadina encompass this historic riding.

Beaches (provincial electoral district) provincial electoral district in Canada

Beaches was a provincial riding in Toronto, Ontario represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1926 to 1967. It was carved completely out of the existing riding of York East. Its boundaries remained the same until 1967 when it was merged with the neighbouring riding of Woodbine to become Beaches—Woodbine. Other than a single session in the 1940s, the riding was steadfastly Conservative in its voting preference.

Humber was a provincial electoral district (riding) in Ontario, Canada. It was created prior to the 1955 provincial election from parts of the York West and York South ridings. It was eliminated in 1996, when most of its territory was incorporated into the ridings of Etobicoke Centre and Etobicoke—Lakeshore. Humber was located in the municipalities of York, Toronto, and Etobicoke.

Thomas Ray Connell was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1951 to 1971. He represented the ridings of Hamilton—Wentworth and Wentworth North. He was a member of cabinet in the governments of Leslie Frost and John Robarts.

Gordon William Innes was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1955 to 1963 and then again from 1967 to 1971. He represented the riding of Oxford.

William Elmer Sandercock was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1948 to 1967 who represented the riding of Hastings West.

Hollis Edward Beckett was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario who represented the riding of York East from 1951 to 1967.

William Beverley (Bev) Lewis was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member from 1955 to 1967 who represented the riding of Humber.

James Frederick Edwards was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member who represented Perth in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1945 to 1967.

Robert Ellsworth Elliott was a politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1945 to 1948 and from 1951 to 1959. He represented the riding of Hamilton East

References

  1. "T.D. Thomas was ex-M.P.P.". Toronto Star. July 31, 1980. p. A10.
  2. 1 2 "Thomas David Thomas Sat for four terms in Ontario House". The Globe and Mail. July 31, 1980. p. P18.
  3. "Many Women Victorious in Ontario Elections". The Montreal Gazette. December 7, 1966.
  4. Canadian Press (June 8, 1948). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 24.
  5. Canadian Press (November 22, 1951). "Complete Ontario Vote". The Montreal Gazette. Montreal. p. 4.
  6. Canadian Press (June 10, 1955). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 4.
  7. Canadian Press (June 12, 1959). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 26.
  8. Canadian Press (September 26, 1963). "78 in Tory Blue Wave -- 23 Is All Grits Saved". The Windsor Star. Windsor, Ontario. p. 25.