Tommy Thompson (outfielder)

Last updated
Tommy Thompson
Outfielder
Born:(1910-05-19)May 19, 1910
Elkhart, Illinois
Died: May 24, 1971(1971-05-24) (aged 61)
Auburn, California
Batted: LeftThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 3,  1933, for the  Boston Braves
Last MLB appearance
June 9,  1939, for the  St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average .266
Home runs 9
Runs batted in 119
Teams

Rupert Lockhart "Tommy" Thompson (May 19, 1910 May 24, 1971) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Braves (1933–36), Chicago White Sox (1938–39), and St. Louis Browns (1939). He was born in Elkhart, Illinois and died in Auburn, California.

In total he played 22 seasons of professional baseball beginning with the Bloomington Bloomers of the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League in 1928. His best season may have been with the San Diego Padres of the Pacific Coast League in 1945, when he had a batting average of .346. His last professional season was with the Pampa Oilers of the West Texas – New Mexico League in 1953.

Related Research Articles

Jim Bottomley American baseball player and manager

James Leroy Bottomley was an American professional baseball player. A first baseman, Bottomley played in Major League Baseball from 1922 through 1937 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, and St. Louis Browns. He also served as player-manager for the Browns in 1937. Playing for the Cardinals against Brooklyn at Ebbets Field on September 16, 1924, Bottomley set the all-time single game RBI record with 12.

Lou Boudreau American baseball player and manager

Louis Boudreau was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 15 seasons, primarily as a shortstop on the Cleveland Indians, and managed four teams for 15 seasons including 10 seasons as a player-manager. He was also a radio announcer for the Chicago Cubs and in college was a dual sport athlete in both baseball and earning All-American honors in basketball for the University of Illinois.

Red Ruffing American baseball player and coach

Charles Herbert "Red" Ruffing was an American professional baseball player. A pitcher, he played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1924 through 1947. He played for the Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, and Chicago White Sox. Ruffing is most remembered for his time with the highly successful Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s.

Ray Schalk American baseball player and coach

Raymond William Schalk was an American professional baseball player, coach, manager and scout. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox for the majority of his career. Known for his fine handling of pitchers and outstanding defensive ability, Schalk was considered the greatest defensive catcher of his era. He revolutionized the way the catching position was played by using his speed and agility to expand the previously accepted defensive capabilities for his position. Schalk was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

Darrin Fletcher American baseball player

Darrin Glen Fletcher is an American former professional baseball catcher and sports commentator. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1989 to 2002 for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies, Montreal Expos, and Toronto Blue Jays.

Rick Reuschel American baseball player

Ricky Eugene Reuschel is an American former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a right-handed pitcher from 1972 to 1991, winning 214 games with a career 3.37 ERA. His nickname was "Big Daddy" because of his portly physique. He was known for his deceptive style of pitching, which kept hitters off balance by constantly varying the speeds of his pitches.

Pete Mackanin American baseball player

Peter Mackanin, Jr., is an American former professional baseball utility player, coach, scout, and manager, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Texas Rangers, Montreal Expos, Philadelphia Phillies, and Minnesota Twins, from 1973 to 1981.

Calvin Wayne Emery, was a professional baseball first baseman and batting coach, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies. He also spent the 1970 season with Hankyu Braves of the Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB). During his playing days, Emery stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall, weighing 205 pounds (93 kg); he threw and batted left-handed. Emery attended Penn State University.

John Rheinecker American baseball player

John Philip Rheinecker was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Texas Rangers.

Fred Beck American baseball player

Frederick Thomas Beck was a baseball player in the major leagues from 1909 to 1911 with the Boston Doves, Cincinnati Reds, and Philadelphia Phillies. In 1914 and 1915, he played for the Chicago Whales of the Federal League. In one season (1910), Beck tied two other players for the league lead in home runs. Beck played minor-league baseball for many years, missing one season due to service in World War I. He retired from professional baseball after the 1926 season.

Erik Daniel Pappas is an American former professional baseball player and coach. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals.

Buzz Capra American baseball player

Lee William Capra, is an American former professional baseball pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Mets and Atlanta Braves, from 1971 to 1977. Nicknamed "Buzz", by a neighbor as a child, Capra was a National League (NL) All-Star and the NL earned run average (ERA) leader, in 1974.

Joe Astroth American baseball player

Joseph Henry Astroth was an American professional baseball player. He played his entire career in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and remained with the team when they moved west and became the Kansas City Athletics in 1955. He batted and threw right-handed, stood 5 feet 9 inches (1.75 m) tall and weighed 187 pounds (85 kg).

Jim Hicks American baseball player

James Edward Hicks was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as an outfielder and first baseman from 1964 to 1970 and in the Nippon Professional Baseball league from 1973 to 1974. He played in 93 games over all or parts of five seasons in Major League Baseball for the Chicago White Sox, St. Louis Cardinals and the California Angels. Born in East Chicago, Indiana, Hicks attended the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. He threw and batted right-handed, stood 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) tall and weighed 205 pounds (93 kg).

Chris Robinson (baseball) Canadian baseball player

Christopher J. Robinson is a Canadian former professional baseball catcher. Prior to beginning his professional career, he played college baseball at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 2003–2005. He has also competed for the Canada national baseball team in international competition such as the 2011 Pan American Games, the 2009 Baseball World Cup and the 2013 World Baseball Classic.

Clay Pflibson Zavada is a former professional baseball pitcher who pitched in Major League Baseball for the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2009. He is noted for his Rollie Fingers moustache.

Albert Earl "Jerry" Akers was a professional baseball player whose career spanned seven seasons, including a part of one in Major League Baseball with the Washington Senators (1912). Akers was a pitcher. During his time in the majors, Akers compiled a record of 1–1 with a 4.87 earned run average (ERA) and 11 strikeouts in five games, one start. Akers also played in the minor leagues with the Class-D Jacksonville Jacks/Lunatics/Braves, the Class-D Kearney Kapitalists (1910), the Class-B Dubuque Dubs (1910), the Class-D Canton Highlanders (1912), the Double-A Montreal Royals (1912), the Double-A Rochester Hustlers (1912) and the Class-B Peoria Distillers (1914). Although statistics for Akers in the minor leagues are incomplete, what is recorded is a record of 70–73 in 166 games. Akers batted and threw right-handed.

Edward James "Irish" Conwell was a professional baseball player from 1909 to 1919. Primarily a third baseman, he appeared in one Major League Baseball game for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1911. He was 5 feet, 11 inches tall and weighed 155 pounds.

Tom Tennant American baseball player

Thomas Francis Tennant was a professional baseball player. In an 11-season minor league career, he had 1,825 hits and a .274 batting average. He also played two games in Major League Baseball in 1912. Tennant was 5 feet, 11 inches tall and weighed 165 pounds.

Geoff Hartlieb American baseball player

Geoffrey Thomas Hartlieb is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates of Major League Baseball (MLB).

References