Tommy Thompson (pitcher)

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Tommy Thompson
Tommy C. Thompson (1913 Atlanta Crackers) 2.jpg
Pitcher
Born:(1889-11-07)November 7, 1889
Spring City, Tennessee
Died: January 16, 1963(1963-01-16) (aged 73)
LaJolla, California
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
June 5,  1912, for the  New York Highlanders
Last MLB appearance
October 5,  1912, for the  New York Highlanders
MLB statistics
Win-Loss record 0-2
Earned run average 6.06
Strikeouts 15
Teams

Thomas Carl Thompson (November 7, 1889 – January 16, 1963) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Thompson played for the New York Highlanders in the 1912 baseball season. In seven career games, he had a 0–2 record, with a 6.06 ERA. He batted and threw right-handed. Thompson was born in Spring City, Tennessee and died in LaJolla, California.

He was the elder brother of Homer Thompson, who played in one game for the Highlanders in 1912.

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