Tommy Tomlin

Last updated
Tommy Tomlin
Position: Guard, tackle
Personal information
Born:(1894-08-17)August 17, 1894
Albemarle County, Virginia
Died:March 23, 1949(1949-03-23) (aged 54)
Woodstock, New York
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:197 lb (89 kg)
Career information
High school: Waltham (MA)
College: Syracuse
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • NFL Champions (1920)
Career NFL statistics as of 1926
Games played:35
Games started:30
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

John Albert "Tommy" Tomlin (August 17, 1894 – March 23, 1949) [1] was an American football player. He played professionally as a guard and tackle who played for the Akron Pros, Hammond Pros, Milwaukee Badgers and New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). He was born to Elizabeth Ford (1859–1927) and George Tomlin (1854–1928). Tomlin won an NFL title in 1920 with Akron.

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