Tommy Turrentine

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Thomas Walter Turrentine, Jr. (April 22, 1928 – May 15, 1997) was a swing and hard bop trumpeter and composer of the 1940s to 1960s. He rarely worked as a bandleader, and was known for his work as a sideman with drummer Max Roach and his younger brother, the saxophonist Stanley Turrentine. [1]

Contents

Biography

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Turrentine played in the bands of Benny Carter, Earl Bostic, Charles Mingus, Billy Eckstine, Dizzy Gillespie, and Count Basie. He later recorded with Sonny Clark, Lou Donaldson, and his brother's bands. His working relationship with Max Roach was spawned in part when he joined the Max Roach Quintet in the late 1950s. Turrentine was also adept on the piano at chord blockings and was a compositional exponent of Thelonious Monk's earlier chordal voicings. His bebop compositions combined a sophisticated and emotional fusion and poignant lyricism reminiscent of Benny Golson and with the passionate, spirited influence of the Brown/Roach Quintet.

While his brother had a successful career and recorded a number of albums over his lifetime, Tommy only recorded one album under his name before retiring in the 1960s. In the 1970s he lived on the ground floor of a brownstone with his wife Jane on West 82nd Street in New York City, a street which during that period had a number of jazz luminaries living along its blocks between Broadway and Central Park, including Tommy Flanagan and Pharoah Sanders.

Tommy Turrentine was rarely active after the 1970s. In the summer of 1979 Turrentine was one of several star trumpeters (including John Faddis and others) who appeared at the Village Gate for an all-star tribute to Blue Mitchell who died earlier that year. Turrentine also appeared on the 1989 album Blue Delight by keyboardist Sun Ra.

He died of cancer at the age of 69. [2]

Discography

As leader

As sideman

With Ahmed Abdul-Malik

With Paul Chambers

With Sonny Clark

With Lou Donaldson

With Booker Ervin

With Dexter Gordon

With Rufus Jones

With Philly Joe Jones

With Abbey Lincoln

With Jackie McLean

With Horace Parlan

With John Patton

With Max Roach

With Archie Shepp

With Sun Ra

With Stanley Turrentine

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