Tomo Iwabuchi

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Tomo Iwabuchi (Japanese: 岩渕 友, Hepburn: Iwabuchi Tomo, 3 October 1976, Fukushima Prefecture) is a member of both the Japanese Communist Party and the Japanese House of Councillors. She was elected to her seat in 2016. [1] Iwabuchi is opposed to nuclear reactors in Japan, advocating for their elimination and against their reactivation. [2]

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References

  1. "Ms.IWABUCHI Tomo:House of Councillors". www.sangiin.go.jp. Retrieved 17 October 2018.
  2. "Reactor restarts haunt Fukushima race". 13 July 2013.