Tomohiro Kuroki

Last updated
Tomohiro Kuroki
Pitcher / Coach
Born: (1973-12-13) December 13, 1973 (age 46)
Hyūga, Miyazaki, Japan
Batted: RightThrew: Right
NPB debut
April 6, 1995, for the  Chiba Lotte Marines
Last NPB appearance
April 27, 2007, for the  Chiba Lotte Marines
NPB statistics
(through 2007)
Win–loss record 76-68
Saves 1
ERA 3.43
Strikeouts 879
Teams
As player

As coach

Career highlights and awards
Last updated on: 17 January 2018

Tomohiro Kuroki (黒木 知宏, born December 13, 1973 in Hyūga, Miyazaki, Japan) is a former Nippon Professional Baseball pitcher.


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