Tomoko Yoshida

Last updated
Tomoko Yoshida
Born
Tomoko Kira

February 6, 1934
NationalityJapanese
Occupationwriter

Tomoko Yoshida (吉田 知子, real name Tomoko Kira吉良 知子; Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture February 6, 1934) is a Japanese writer. She has won the Akutagawa Prize, the Izumi Kyōka Prize for Literature, the Women's Literature Prize, and the Kawabata Yasunari Literature Prize.

Contents

Early life and education

Yoshida grew up in Shinkyō (currently Changchun), the capital of Manchukuo, in Manchuria. [1] Her father was a professional soldier who was taken to the USSR by Soviet troops at the close of World War II in 1945. Between 1945 and 1947, Yoshida was detained on the island of Karafuto (Sakhalin). Her mother brought her back to Japan, where Yoshida studied economics at Nagoya Municipal Junior Two-Year College for Women. She graduated in 1954 and worked as a high school teacher in Hamamatsu until 1960. [2] [3] In 1957, she married teacher and writer Kira Nin'ichi. [3]

Awards

Works (selection)

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References

  1. Kurzinfo beim Verlag Shicho
  2. Mulhern, Chieko Irie (1994). Japanese Women Writers: A Bio-critical Sourcebook. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN   9780313254864.
  3. 1 2 Schierbeck, Sachiko Shibata; Edelstein, Marlene R. (1994). Japanese Women Novelists in the 20th Century: 104 Biographies, 1900-1993. Museum Tusculanum Press. ISBN   9788772892689.
  4. "芥川賞受賞者一覧" [Akutagawa Prize Recipient List] (in Japanese). 日本文学振興会. Retrieved September 12, 2018.
  5. "女流文学賞受賞作品一覧" [Women's Literature Prize Winning Works List] (in Japanese). Chuokoron-Shinsha . Retrieved September 12, 2018.
  6. "川端康成文学賞 過去の受賞作品" [Kawabata Yasunari Literature Prize Past Winning Works] (in Japanese). Shinchosha . Retrieved September 12, 2018.
  7. "泉鏡花文学賞" [Izumi Kyōka Prize for Literature] (in Japanese). City of Kanazawa . Retrieved September 12, 2018.