Tomomi Iwahara

Last updated
Tomomi Iwahara
Born (1987-12-19) December 19, 1987 (age 32)
Height 1.61 m (5 ft 3 in)
Weight 61 kg (134 lb; 9 st 8 lb)
Position Forward
Shoots Left
J-League team Seibu Princess Rabbits
National teamFlag of Japan.svg  Japan
Playing careerpresent

Tomomi Iwahara (岩原 知美, Iwahara Tomomi, born December 19, 1987) is a Japanese ice hockey player for Seibu Princess Rabbits and the Japanese national team. She participated at the 2015 IIHF Women's World Championship. [1]

Iwahara competed at the 2018 Winter Olympics. [2]

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References

  1. 2015 IIHF World Championship roster Archived 2018-01-03 at the Wayback Machine
  2. "Tomomi Iwahara". Pyeongchang 2018. Retrieved February 10, 2018.