Tomorrow's Another Day (2011 film)

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Tomorrow's Another Day (Swedish : Det är en dag imorgon också) is a 2011 documentary about Swedish film director Roy Andersson and his unique way of making films. Shot during the four-year-long filming Andersson's 2007 film You, the Living , the documentary is a personal description of a surprising and different approach to the creative process. Roy Andersson has invented a working method of his own in order to achieve control over the work in process, but he is ultimately dependent on his young co-workers.

The film was released in April 2011. A shorter version of the film has been shown at the Museum of Modern Art, in New York United States of America.


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Tomorrow's Another Day may refer to:

<i>A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence</i>

A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence is a 2014 internationally co-produced black comedy-drama film written and directed by Roy Andersson. It is the third installment in his "Living" trilogy, following Songs from the Second Floor (2000) and You, the Living (2007). It premiered at the 71st Venice International Film Festival where it was awarded the Golden Lion for Best Film. It was selected as the Swedish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 88th Academy Awards but it was not nominated.

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