Tomyhoi Peak

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Tomyhoi Peak
Tomyhoi Peak Tomyhoi Lake.jpg
Tomyhoi Peak seen from Winchester Mountain
(Mt. McGuire in upper right)
Highest point
Elevation 7,439 ft (2,267 m)  NAVD 88 [1]
Prominence 2,035 ft (620 m) [1]
Coordinates 48°58′30″N121°42′35″W / 48.974939°N 121.709832°W / 48.974939; -121.709832 Coordinates: 48°58′30″N121°42′35″W / 48.974939°N 121.709832°W / 48.974939; -121.709832 [1]
Geography
USA Washington relief location map.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Tomyhoi Peak
Usa edcp relief location map.png
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Tomyhoi Peak
Tomyhoi Peak (the United States)
Parent range North Cascades
Topo map USGS Mt. Larrabee
Climbing
First ascent 1927 Lage Wernstedt [2]
Easiest route Scrambling

Tomyhoi Peak is a 7,439-foot (2,267-metre) Skagit Range mountain situated one mile south of the Canada–United States border, in the North Cascades of Washington state. It is located west of Mount Larrabee and within the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is part of the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.

Contents

The nearest higher peak is Canadian Border Peak, 2.4 miles (3.9 km) to the northeast. [1] Precipitation runoff on the east side of the mountain drains into Tomyhoi Lake and Tomyhoi Creek, whereas the west side of the mountain drains into Damfino Creek. The unofficially named Tomyhoi Glacier lies on its north flank. The summit offers views of Mount Larrabee, American Border Peak, Canadian Border Peak, Mount Shuksan, and Mount Baker.

Access

The Keep Kool Trail (#699) is accessed by the Twin Lakes Road (Forest Service #3065 in the North Fork Nooksack area) off of the Mount Baker Highway. The first 4.5 miles (7.2 km) to the Keep Kool trailhead is well maintained.

Climate

Tomyhoi Peak is located in the marine west coast climate zone of western North America. [3] Most weather fronts originate in the Pacific Ocean, and travel northeast toward the Cascade Mountains.

Tomyhoi Peak and Canadian Border Peak Tomyhoi Peak and Canadian Border Peak.jpg
Tomyhoi Peak and Canadian Border Peak

As fronts approach the North Cascades, they are forced upward by the peaks of the Cascade Range, causing them to drop their moisture in the form of rain or snowfall onto the Cascades (Orographic lift). As a result, the west side of the North Cascades experiences high precipitation, especially during the winter months in the form of snowfall. [3] Due to its temperate climate and proximity to the Pacific Ocean, areas west of the Cascade Crest very rarely experience temperatures below 0 °F (−18 °C) or above 80 °F (27 °C). [3] During winter months, weather is usually cloudy, but, due to high pressure systems over the Pacific Ocean that intensify during summer months, there is often little or no cloud cover during the summer. [4] Because of maritime influence, snow tends to be wet and heavy, resulting in high avalanche danger. [4]

Geology

The North Cascades features some of the most rugged topography in the Cascade Range with craggy peaks, ridges, and deep glacial valleys. Geological events occurring many years ago created the diverse topography and drastic elevation changes over the Cascade Range leading to various climate differences.

Tomyhoi seen from Mt. McGuire in Canada Tomyhoi Peak north aspect.jpg
Tomyhoi seen from Mt. McGuire in Canada

The history of the formation of the Cascade Mountains dates back millions of years ago to the late Eocene Epoch. [5] With the North American Plate overriding the Pacific Plate, episodes of volcanic igneous activity persisted. [5] In addition, small fragments of the oceanic and continental lithosphere called terranes created the North Cascades about 50 million years ago. [5]

During the Pleistocene period dating back over two million years ago, glaciation advancing and retreating repeatedly scoured and shaped the landscape. [5] The U-shaped cross section of the river valleys are a result of recent glaciation. Uplift and faulting in combination with glaciation have been the dominant processes which have created the tall peaks and deep valleys of the North Cascades area.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Huckleberry Mountain (Washington)

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Bryant Peak

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Table Mountain (Whatcom County, Washington)

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Mount Misch

Mount Misch is a remote 7,435 ft mountain summit in the North Cascades, in Skagit County of Washington state. It is the highest point of the Buckindy Range, or Buckindy Ridge. It is located 19 miles east-northeast of Darrington, Washington, and 15 miles north-northwest of Glacier Peak which is one of the Cascade stratovolcanoes. It is situated in the Glacier Peak Wilderness on land administered by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Mount Misch was named by mountaineer and author Fred Beckey for his friend Peter Misch (1909-1987), University of Washington geology professor and mountaineer, who was renowned for his study of the North Cascades. Precipitation runoff from Mount Misch and the unnamed Goat Creek glacier on its east slope drains into tributaries of the Suiattle River and ultimately the Skagit River.

Goat Mountain (Whatcom County)

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Mount Chaval

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Preacher Mountain

Preacher Mountain is a broad summit located in King County of Washington state. It's located at the western edge of the Cascade Range and is within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. The nearest higher peak is Kaleetan Peak, 3.11 miles (5.01 km) to the southeast. The Pulpit is situated 2.19 miles to the northwest. Precipitation runoff from the mountain drains into tributaries of the Snoqualmie River.

Summit Chief Mountain mountain in the United States of America

Summit Chief Mountain is a 7,464-foot (2,275-metre) mountain summit located on the county line separating King County and Kittitas County of Washington state. It is entirely within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Summit Chief Mountain is situated on the crest of the Cascade Range, nine miles northeast of Snoqualmie Pass. Precipitation runoff from the west side of the mountain drains into tributaries of the Snoqualmie River, whereas the east side drains into tributaries of the Yakima River. The nearest higher peak is Chimney Rock, 1.29 miles (2.08 km) to the southwest.

Kololo Peaks

Kololo Peaks is an 8,200+ ft mountain located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness of the North Cascades in Washington state. The mountain is situated on the crest of the Cascade Range, on the shared border of Snohomish County and Chelan County, and also straddling the boundary between Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and Wenatchee National Forest. Its nearest higher peak is Glacier Peak, 3.29 mi (5.29 km) to the north. Precipitation runoff and melt-water from the White River Glacier on the southeast slope drains into White River. On the west slope, the White Chuck Glacier drains into the White Chuck River, and the Suiattle Glacier and Honeycomb Glacier on the north and east sides drain into the Suiattle River. Surrounded by these glaciers, Fred Beckey in his Cascade Alpine Guide describes the mountain as being almost a nunatak.

Mount Defiance (Washington)

Mount Defiance is a 5,584-foot (1,702-metre) mountain summit located in King County of Washington state. It's part of the Cascade Range and is within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness. Mount Defiance is situated 6.5 mi (10.5 km) west of Snoqualmie Pass on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Precipitation runoff on the mountain drains into tributaries of the Snoqualmie River. The nearest higher peak is Granite Mountain, 3.96 mi (6.37 km) to the east-southeast, and Bandera Mountain is 1.85 mi (2.98 km) to the southeast. Mount Defiance can be reached by trail, with access by the Ira Spring, Talapus Lake, or Pratt Lake trailheads.

Mount Thomson

Mount Thomson is a prominent 6,554-foot (1,998-metre) mountain summit located in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness in eastern King County of Washington state. It's part of the Cascade Range and is a half mile east of the crest of the range. Mount Thomson is situated 4 mi (6.4 km) northeast of Snoqualmie Pass on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Precipitation runoff on the mountain drains into the Middle Fork of Snoqualmie River. The nearest peak is Alaska Mountain 0.81 mi (1.30 km) to the southeast, and the nearest higher peak is Chikamin Peak, 2.08 mi (3.35 km) to the east. The mountain was named for Reginald Heber Thomson (1856-1949), a Seattle city engineer who reshaped the face of Seattle. The first ascent of the peak was made in 1917 by Joe Hazard and B. French.

White Mountain (Washington)

White Mountain is a 7,043-foot (2,147-metre) mountain located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness of the North Cascades in Washington state. The mountain is situated on the crest of the Cascade Range, on the shared border of Snohomish County and Chelan County, and also straddling the boundary between Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and Wenatchee National Forest. White Mountain is located 3.04 mi (4.89 km) to the west-southwest of Kololo Peaks, and immediately north of White Pass. The Pacific Crest Trail traverses the south slope of the peak. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains into the White River, White Chuck River, and Sauk River.

Napeequa Peak

Napeequa Peak is an 8,073-foot (2,461-metre) pyramidal mountain summit located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness of the North Cascades in Washington state. The mountain is situated on the crest of the Cascade Range, on the shared border of Snohomish County and Chelan County, also straddling the boundary between the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and the Wenatchee National Forest. Its nearest higher peak is Buck Mountain, 2.56 mi (4.12 km) to the east-southeast. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains east to the headwaters of Napeequa River; or west into the Suiattle River. The mountain's name is taken from the river's name, which was applied by Albert Hale Sylvester (1871-1944), a pioneer surveyor, explorer, topographer, and forest supervisor in the Cascades.

References

The rugged west face of Tomyhoi Peak Tomyhoi Peak west face.jpg
The rugged west face of Tomyhoi Peak
  1. 1 2 3 4 "Tomyhoi Peak, Washington". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2018-07-12.
  2. Beckey, Fred W. Cascade Alpine Guide, Climbing and High Routes. Seattle, WA: Mountaineers Books, 2008.
  3. 1 2 3 Beckey, p. 15
  4. 1 2 Beckey, p. 16
  5. 1 2 3 4 Kruckeberg, Arthur (1991). The Natural History of Puget Sound Country. University of Washington Press.