Tomyhoi Peak

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Tomyhoi Peak
Tomyhoi winter.jpg
Tomyhoi Peak seen from Canada
Highest point
Elevation 7,439 ft (2,267 m)  NAVD 88 [1]
Prominence 2,035 ft (620 m) [1]
Parent peak Mount Larrabee [2] [1]
Isolation 2.46 mi (3.96 km) [2]
Coordinates 48°58′30″N121°42′35″W / 48.974939°N 121.709832°W / 48.974939; -121.709832 Coordinates: 48°58′30″N121°42′35″W / 48.974939°N 121.709832°W / 48.974939; -121.709832 [1]
Geography
USA Washington relief location map.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Tomyhoi Peak
Location in Washington
Usa edcp relief location map.png
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Tomyhoi Peak
Tomyhoi Peak (the United States)
Location
Parent range North Cascades
Topo map USGS Mount Larrabee
Climbing
First ascent 1927 Lage Wernstedt [3]
Easiest route Scrambling

Tomyhoi Peak is a 7,439-foot (2,267-metre) Skagit Range mountain situated one mile south of the Canada–United States border, in the North Cascades of Washington state. It is located west of Mount Larrabee and within the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is part of the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. This mountain's name was officially adopted in 1913 by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names. [4]

Contents

The nearest higher peak is Canadian Border Peak, 2.4 miles (3.9 km) to the northeast. [1] Precipitation runoff on the east side of the mountain drains into Tomyhoi Lake and Tomyhoi Creek, whereas the west side of the mountain drains into Damfino Creek. The unofficially named Tomyhoi Glacier lies on its north flank. The summit offers views of Mount Larrabee, American Border Peak, Canadian Border Peak, Mount Shuksan, and Mount Baker.

Access

The Keep Kool Trail (#699) is accessed by the Twin Lakes Road (Forest Service #3065 in the North Fork Nooksack area) off of the Mount Baker Highway. The first 4.5 miles (7.2 km) to the Keep Kool trailhead is well maintained.

Climate

Tomyhoi Peak is located in the marine west coast climate zone of western North America. [3] Most weather fronts originate in the Pacific Ocean, and travel northeast toward the Cascade Mountains.

Tomyhoi Peak and Canadian Border Peak Tomyhoi Peak and Canadian Border Peak.jpg
Tomyhoi Peak and Canadian Border Peak

As fronts approach the North Cascades, they are forced upward by the peaks of the Cascade Range, causing them to drop their moisture in the form of rain or snowfall onto the Cascades (Orographic lift). As a result, the west side of the North Cascades experiences high precipitation, especially during the winter months in the form of snowfall. [3] Due to its temperate climate and proximity to the Pacific Ocean, areas west of the Cascade Crest very rarely experience temperatures below 0 °F (−18 °C) or above 80 °F (27 °C). [3] During winter months, weather is usually cloudy, but, due to high pressure systems over the Pacific Ocean that intensify during summer months, there is often little or no cloud cover during the summer. [3] Because of maritime influence, snow tends to be wet and heavy, resulting in high avalanche danger. [3]

Geology

The North Cascades features some of the most rugged topography in the Cascade Range with craggy peaks, ridges, and deep glacial valleys. Geological events occurring many years ago created the diverse topography and drastic elevation changes over the Cascade Range leading to various climate differences.

Tomyhoi seen from Mt. McGuire in Canada Tomyhoi Peak north aspect.jpg
Tomyhoi seen from Mt. McGuire in Canada

The history of the formation of the Cascade Mountains dates back millions of years ago to the late Eocene Epoch. [5] With the North American Plate overriding the Pacific Plate, episodes of volcanic igneous activity persisted. [5] In addition, small fragments of the oceanic and continental lithosphere called terranes created the North Cascades about 50 million years ago. [5]

During the Pleistocene period dating back over two million years ago, glaciation advancing and retreating repeatedly scoured and shaped the landscape. [5] The U-shaped cross section of the river valleys are a result of recent glaciation. Uplift and faulting in combination with glaciation have been the dominant processes which have created the tall peaks and deep valleys of the North Cascades area.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Mount Larrabee mountain in the United States of America

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Fortress Mountain (Washington)

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Ruth Mountain

Ruth Mountain is a 7,115 ft (2,170 m) Skagit Range summit located two miles south of Hannegan Pass in the North Cascades of Washington state. The name honors Ruth Cleveland, daughter of President Grover Cleveland. This mountain's name was officially adopted in 1952 by the United States Board on Geographic Names. Ruth Mountain is situated on the shared border of North Cascades National Park and the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is part of the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. The summit offers views of Mount Shuksan, East Nooksack Glacier, Seahpo Peak, Nooksack Tower, Icy Peak, Mount Sefrit, Mineral Mountain, and the Picket Range. The melting and receding Ruth Glacier on the north slope of Ruth creates the headwaters for the Chilliwack River. Precipitation runoff also finds its way into the Nooksack and Baker Rivers.

Table Mountain (Whatcom County, Washington)

Table Mountain is a Skagit Range summit located west of Mount Shuksan and northeast of Mount Baker in the North Cascades of Washington state. It is situated in the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is managed by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Table Mountain is located west of Artist Point, at the end of the Mount Baker Highway. From the Artist Point parking lot, a short 1.4 mile trail leads to the summit at the west end of the mountain. The summit offers views of Mount Shuksan, Mount Baker, Mount Hermann, and Mount Larrabee. Remnants of the Table Mountain Glacier are on the northeast slope. Precipitation runoff from the mountain drains into tributaries of the Skagit and Nooksack Rivers.

Mount Misch

Mount Misch is a remote 7,435 ft mountain summit in the North Cascades, in Skagit County of Washington state. It is the highest point of the Buckindy Range, or Buckindy Ridge. It is located 19 miles east-northeast of Darrington, Washington, and 15 miles north-northwest of Glacier Peak which is one of the Cascade stratovolcanoes. It is situated in the Glacier Peak Wilderness on land administered by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Mount Misch was named by mountaineer and author Fred Beckey for his friend Peter Misch (1909-1987), University of Washington geology professor and mountaineer, who was renowned for his study of the North Cascades. Precipitation runoff from Mount Misch and the unnamed Goat Creek glacier on its east slope drains into tributaries of the Suiattle River and ultimately the Skagit River.

Goat Mountain (Whatcom County)

Goat Mountain is a 6,844 ft summit in the Skagit Range which is a subset of the North Cascades of Washington state. It is located south of Mount Larrabee and north of Mount Shuksan in the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is managed by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Goat Mountain has a subsidiary 6,725 ft summit known as the west peak, and remnants of what was colloquially known as the Swamp Creek Glacier rest on the northern slope between the two summits. Its nearest higher neighbor is Mount Chardonnay, 2.75 mi (4.43 km) to the east. The Silver Tip Mine was located on the south slope of the mountain near the 3,000 ft level. The mine produced silver and gold in the 1940s. Precipitation runoff from the mountain drains into tributaries of the Fraser River and the Nooksack River.

Snowking Mountain

Snowking Mountain is a 7,433-foot (2,266-metre) summit located in Skagit County of Washington state. Situated within the Glacier Peak Wilderness, Snowking Mountain is positioned west of the crest of the North Cascades Range, approximately 18 miles northeast of the town of Darrington. It has two subsidiary peaks, West Peak (7425 ft), and Middle Peak (7400 ft). Its nearest higher peak is Mount Misch, 5.75 miles (9.25 km) to the southeast. A broad unnamed glacier known colloquially as Snowking Glacier rests on the north face. Downslope of that glacier are Snowking Lake, Found Lake, and Cyclone Lake. Precipitation runoff from Snowking Mountain drains into tributaries of the Skagit River.

Napeequa Peak

Napeequa Peak is an 8,073-foot (2,461-metre) pyramidal mountain summit located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness of the North Cascades in Washington state. The mountain is situated on the crest of the Cascade Range, on the shared border of Snohomish County and Chelan County, also straddling the boundary between the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and the Wenatchee National Forest. Its nearest neighbor is Cirque Mountain, 0.3 mi to the north, and the nearest higher peak is Buck Mountain, 2.56 mi (4.12 km) to the east-southeast. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains east to the headwaters of Napeequa River; or west into the Suiattle River. The mountain's name is taken from the river's name, which was applied by Albert Hale Sylvester (1871-1944), a pioneer surveyor, explorer, topographer, and forest supervisor in the Cascades.

Mount Chardonnay

Mount Chardonnay is a prominent 7,020+ ft mountain summit located in the Skagit Range, which is a subset of the North Cascades in Whatcom County of Washington state. It is situated 1.7 mi (2.7 km) north of Granite Mountain and 2.75 mi (4.43 km) east of Goat Mountain in the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is managed by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Its nearest higher peak is Mount Sefrit, 2.77 mi (4.46 km) to the southwest. Precipitation runoff from the mountain drains into Silesia Creek, a tributary of the Fraser River.

Hannegan Peak

Hannegan Peak is a 6,191-foot (1,887-metre) mountain summit located in the Skagit Range, which is a subset of the North Cascades in Whatcom County of Washington state. It is situated immediately north of Hannegan Pass, and 2.2 mi (3.5 km) north of Ruth Mountain in the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Banning Austin and R.M. Lyle made the first ascent of Hannegan Peak in 1893 while surveying for a possible road across the Cascades over Hannegan Pass to Whatcom Pass. This peak was named in association with Hannegan Pass, which in turn was named for Tom Hannegan, State Road Commissioner at that time. Although no road was built, a four-mile trail leads hikers to the pass, and another one-mile path leads to the summit. Peaks which can be seen from the summit include Mount Shuksan, Ruth Mountain, Mineral Mountain, Mount Baker, Mount Sefrit, Mount Larrabee, Granite Mountain, Mount Chardonnay, Mount Rexford, the Picket Range, and many more.

Cirque Mountain (Washington)

Cirque Mountain is a 7,966-foot (2,428-metre) mountain summit located in the Glacier Peak Wilderness of the North Cascades in Washington state. The mountain is situated on the crest of the Cascade Range, on the shared border of Snohomish County and Chelan County, also straddling the boundary between the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and the Wenatchee National Forest. Its nearest higher peak is Napeequa Peak, 0.3 mi (0.48 km) to the south. The peak is set on Chiwawa Ridge with Napeequa, and other notable peaks on this ridge include Fortress Mountain, Buck Mountain, Brahma Peak, Mount Berge, and Chiwawa Mountain. Topographic relief is significant since the western aspect of the mountain rises 4,000 feet above the Suiattle Valley in approximately 1.5 mi (2.4 km). This mountain has small, unnamed, hanging glaciers in cirques surrounding the summit. Precipitation runoff from the peak and meltwater from the glaciers drains east to the headwaters of Napeequa River; or west into the Suiattle River.

Surprise Mountain

Surprise Mountain is a 6,330-foot (1,930-metre) mountain summit located above the southern end of Glacier Lake, in eastern King County of Washington state. It's part of the Wenatchee Mountains, which are a subset of the Cascade Range, and is situated in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Precipitation runoff from the mountain drains into Surprise Creek and Deception Creek, both tributaries of the Skykomish River. The nearest higher neighbor is Thunder Mountain, 0.88 mi (1.42 km) to the northeast, and Terrace Mountain is set 3 mi (4.8 km) to the southwest. The Pacific Crest Trail skirts this peak as it passes through Surprise Gap.

Thunder Mountain (Washington)

Thunder Mountain is a 6,556-foot (1,998-metre) mountain summit located above the eastern shore of Glacier Lake, on the common border of King County and Chelan County in Washington state. It's part of the Wenatchee Mountains, which are a subset of the Cascade Range, and is situated in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Precipitation runoff from the mountain drains west into Surprise Creek, or east into tributaries of Icicle Creek. The nearest higher neighbor is Nimbus Mountain, 0.56 mi (0.90 km) to the northeast, and Surprise Mountain is set 0.88 mi (1.42 km) to the southwest. The Pacific Crest Trail skirts this peak as it passes between Thunder Mountain and Spark Plug Mountain.

Pocket Peak

Pocket Peak is a 7,056-foot (2,151-metre) mountain summit located in the Skagit Range, which is a subset of the North Cascades in Whatcom County of Washington state. It is situated immediately west of Pocket Lake, and 4 mi (6.4 km) east of Mount Larrabee in the Mount Baker Wilderness, which is managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Pocket Peak is set on the Slesse Divide, 0.7 mile south of the Canada–United States border. Its nearest higher neighbor is Rapid Peak, 2.24 mi (3.60 km) to the southeast, and Slesse Mountain is set 3.24 mi (5.21 km) to the northwest. Other peaks which can be seen from the summit include Mount Baker, Mount Shuksan, American Border Peak, Mount Chardonnay, Mount Rexford, and many more. This unofficially named peak is named in association with officially named Pocket Lake. Precipitation runoff from this mountain drains into Silesia and Ensawkwatch Creeks, which are both tributaries of the Chilliwack River.

Skykomish Peak

Skykomish Peak is a 6,368-foot (1,941-metre) mountain summit located in the Henry M. Jackson Wilderness in the North Cascades of Washington state. The mountain is situated on the crest of the Cascade Range, on the shared border of Snohomish County with Chelan County, and also straddling the boundary between Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Skykomish Peak is located 15 mi (24 km) to the north of Stevens Pass, and the Pacific Crest Trail traverses the east slope of this peak. Precipitation runoff from the peak drains west into the Skykomish River, or east into Cady Creek which is a tributary of Little Wenatchee River. This mountain's name derives from its position at the head of the North Fork Skykomish River, and "Skykomish" comes from the Northern Lushootseed word /sq'íxʷəbš/, meaning "upriver people".

La Bohn Peak

La Bohn Peak is a 6,585-foot (2,007-metre) mountain summit located two miles north of Dutch Miller Gap, in east King County of Washington state. It is situated at the head of Necklace Valley, in the heart of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. La Bohn Peak is set west of La Bohn Lakes and La Bohn Gap, and one mile west of the crest of the Cascade Range. Precipitation runoff from the south side of the mountain drains into tributaries of the Snoqualmie River, whereas the north side drains into tributaries of the Foss River. The nearest higher neighbor is Mount Hinman, 1.7 miles (2.7 km) to the east, Little Big Chief Mountain is set 2.3 miles (3.7 km) to the south, and Iron Cap Mountain sits 1.77 miles (2.85 km) to the west.

Yellow Aster Butte

Yellow Aster Butte is a 6,241-foot (1,902-metre) Skagit Range summit located three miles south of the Canada–United States border, in Whatcom County of Washington state. It is situated within the Mount Baker Wilderness, on land managed by Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. The nearest higher neighbor is Winchester Mountain, 1.77 miles (2.85 km) to the east, and Mount Larrabee is set 2.3 miles (3.7 km) to the northeast. The summit offers views of Mount Larrabee, Tomyhoi Peak, American Border Peak, Canadian Border Peak, Mount Shuksan, and Mount Baker. Precipitation runoff on the north side of the mountain drains into Tomyhoi Creek, whereas the west side of the mountain drains into Damfino Creek, and the south slope is drained by Swamp Creek.

References

The rugged west face of Tomyhoi Peak Tomyhoi Peak west face.jpg
The rugged west face of Tomyhoi Peak
  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Tomyhoi Peak, Washington". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2018-07-12.
  2. 1 2 "Tomyhoi Peak - 7,435' WA". listsofjohn.com. Retrieved 2020-05-25.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Beckey, Fred W. Cascade Alpine Guide, Climbing and High Routes. Seattle, WA: Mountaineers Books, 2008.
  4. "Tomyhoi Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2020-05-25.
  5. 1 2 3 4 Kruckeberg, Arthur (1991). The Natural History of Puget Sound Country. University of Washington Press.