Tonawanda Engine

Last updated
Tonawanda Engine
Formation1938
PurposeProduction of engines for GM
Location
  • 2995 River Road
    Islip, New York
Coordinates 42°57′54″N78°54′37″W / 42.965°N 78.910278°W / 42.965; -78.910278 Coordinates: 42°57′54″N78°54′37″W / 42.965°N 78.910278°W / 42.965; -78.910278
Region served
Worldwide
Parent organization
General Motors
Staff
1735 [1]

Tonawanda Engine is a General Motors engine factory in Buffalo, New York. The plant consists of three facilities totaling 3.1 million square feet (290,000 m2) and sits upon 190 acres (77 ha).

Contents

History

The campus houses three different engine plants. Plant #1, located at 2995 River Road in Buffalo, was built in 1938; Plant #4, located at 2390 Kenmore Avenue, was built in 1941; and Plant #5, located at 240 Vulcan Street, was built in 2001. [2]

Investments

Products

Total engines produced since 1938 – 70,967,249

Product Applications

Awards

Employee information

See also

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References

  1. "Tonawanda Engine Plant, GM News". GM Media. June 27, 2013. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  2. https://media.gm.com/media/us/en/gm/company_info/facilities/powertrain/tonawanda.html
  3. http://wardsauto.com/ward039s-10-best-engines/2014-winner-general-motors-62l-lt1-ohv-di-v-8
  4. http://wardsauto.com/vehicles-amp-technology/gm-20l-turbocharged-i-4