Tonga women's national rugby league team

Last updated
Tonga
Team information
Governing body 'Akapulu Liiki Fēfine 'a Tonga
Region Asia-Pacific
Home stadium Teufaiva
Uniforms
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body thinwhitesides.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours

The Tonga women's national rugby league team, also known as 'Akapulu Liiki Fēfine 'a Tonga. They are administered by the Tonga Women's National Rugby League Incorporated. The very first Tonga womens team was in 2003 and known as the Mate Ma'a Tonga womens team administrated by The Tonga National Rugby League (TNRL) body. This newly formed all led womens board was established on the 23 November 2020, an autonomous womens' rugby league body to administer womens rugby league in Tonga.

Contents

Results

Full internationals

DateOpponentScoreTournamentVenueRef.
30 Sep 2003Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa
4–44
2003 WRLWC Flag of New Zealand.svg North Harbour Stadium DT [1]
2 Oct 2003Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
0–54
NZH [2]
4 Oct 2003Flag of Tokelau.svg Tokelau
4–28
AWRL [3]
8 Oct 2003Flag of Niue.svg Niue
14–14
DT [4]
12 Oct 2003Flag of Tokelau.svg Tokelau
12–26
RLR [5]
6 Nov 2008Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa
0–40
2008 WRLWC Flag of Australia (converted).svg Stockland Park, Sunshine Coast
8 Nov 2008Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
4–42
VR [6]
10 Nov 2008  Pacific Islands
14–44
SCD [7]
12 Nov 2008Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
12–24
SCD [8]
14 Nov 2008Flag of France.svg  France
4–34
SCD [9]
7 Nov 2020Flag of Niue.svg Niue
66–8
Test MatchFlag of New Zealand.svg Mount Smart Stadium, AucklandVR [10] Fox [11]

Nines

DateOpponentScoreTournamentVenueRef.
23 Feb 2018Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
8–4
2018 Commonwealth Championship Flag of Australia (converted).svg Dolphin Stadium, Brisbane CRL [12] VR [13]
23 Feb 2018Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands
12–4
QRL [14]
24 Feb 2018Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa
0–20
LRL [15]
24 Feb 2018Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands
0–20

See also

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References

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  2. Gillan, Gordon (2 Oct 2003). "Kiwi Ferns face onslaught". New Zealand Herald. p. 15.
  3. Birchall, Steven (4 Oct 2003) [2003]. "Womens World Cup : Round Three Results". Womens RLeague. Australian Womens Rugby League. Retrieved 30 Oct 2020.
  4. "SPORT details". Daily Telegraph. 9 Oct 2003. p. 57.
  5. "Women's Rugby League". Rugby League Review. 1 Nov 2003. p. 8.
  6. "Kiwi Ferns v Tonga". YouTube. NZ Rugby League. 4 Aug 2017 [2008]. Retrieved 30 Sep 2020.
  7. Gardiner, Peter (11 Nov 2008). "Poms Put In Place". Sunshine Coast Daily. p. 40.
  8. Tuxworth, Jon (13 Nov 2008). "Sister Act". Sunshine Coast Daily. p. 48.
  9. "English pride comes to the fore". Sunshine Coast Daily. 15 Nov 2008. p. 106.
  10. "Niue Women vs Tonga Women 2020 Full". NZRugbyVidz. 7 Nov 2020. Retrieved 9 Nov 2020.
  11. "Tonga Women Niue Women". Fox Sports. 7 Nov 2020. Retrieved 9 Nov 2020.
  12. Clarkstone, Julian (23 Feb 2018). "Commonwealth Championships: Day One Wrap-Up". Canada Rugby League. Retrieved 19 Apr 2021.CS1 maint: date and year (link)
  13. "2018 Commonwealth Championships: Canada Ravens vs. Tonga". YouTube. Canada Rugby League. 25 Feb 2018. Retrieved 18 Apr 2021.
  14. "Commonwealth Championship: Day 1 Results". QRL. Commonwealth Championship Media. 23 Feb 2018. Retrieved 1 Apr 2021.
  15. "Commonwealth Championships Results - Day Two". Love Rugby League. 24 Feb 2018. Retrieved 1 Apr 2021.