Tongue Peak

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Tongue Peak is a peak rising to about 2,450 m between Holdsworth Glacier and Scott Glacier, 3 nautical miles (6 km) west-northwest of Mount Farley, in the Queen Maud Mountains, Antarctica. The peak was mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1960–64. It was geologically mapped by a United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP)-Arizona State University field party, 1978–79, and was named by geologist Scott G. Borg, a member of the party. The name derives from a well-developed tongue-shaped moraine in an abandoned cirque between the west and north ridges of the peak.

Holdsworth Glacier is a tributary glacier about 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, flowing northeast from Fuller Dome to enter the southeast side of Bartlett Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Gerald Holdsworth, who was involved in geological studies at McMurdo Station in the summer of 1965–66.

Scott Glacier (Transantarctic Mountains)

The Scott Glacier is a major glacier, 120 miles (190 km) long, that drains the East Antarctic Ice Sheet through the Queen Maud Mountains to the Ross Ice Shelf. The Scott Glacier is one of a series of major glaciers flowing across the Transantarctic Mountains, with the Amundsen Glacier to the west and the Leverett and Reedy glaciers to the east.

Mount Farley is a conspicuous rock peak, 2,670 metres (8,760 ft) high, standing at the west side of Scott Glacier, 3 nautical miles (6 km) east of McNally Peak, in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica. It was discovered in December 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition geological party under Quin Blackburn, and named at that time by Richard E. Byrd for the Hon. James Farley, United States Postmaster General.

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United States Geological Survey Scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

Coordinates: 86°34′S153°2′W / 86.567°S 153.033°W / -86.567; -153.033

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.


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