Tonnachau Mountain

Last updated
Tonnachau Mountain

Tonnachau Mountain.jpg

View from Fono Island
Highest point
Elevation 1,100 ft (340 m) [1]
Coordinates 7°27′35″N151°50′59″E / 7.4596°N 151.84972°E / 7.4596; 151.84972 Coordinates: 7°27′35″N151°50′59″E / 7.4596°N 151.84972°E / 7.4596; 151.84972
Geography
Location Moen, Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia
Geology
Mountain type Volcanic

Tonnachau Mountain (also variously spelled Tonachau and Tonaachaw), is a mountain on Moen Island in Chuuk State of the Federated States of Micronesia. Rising to a height of 1,100 feet (340 m), it is not the highest peak of Moen, which is Mount Teroken to the south. Tonnachau is, however, a prominent landmark rising above Chuuk International Airport. The mountain also has an important place in Chuukese culture and prehistory, with archaeologically significant prehistoric middens and fortifications on its summit ridge which date back as far as 4,000 BCE. Chuukese tradition states that its hero Soukachou built a fort on Tonachau when he arrived from Kosrae and established rule over the lagoon. The mountain also has extensive remains of mainly Japanese fortifications erected during World War II. [1]

Weno island in Federated States of Micronesia

Weno is an island municipality of Chuuk State of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). It is the largest town in the FSM.

Chuuk State state in Federated States of Micronesia

Chuuk State is one of the four states of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). The other states are Kosrae State, Pohnpei State, and Yap State. It consists of several island groups:

Federated States of Micronesia Island republic in Oceania

The Federated States of Micronesia is an independent republic associated to the United States. It consists of four states – from west to east, Yap, Chuuk, Pohnpei and Kosrae – that are spread across the Western Pacific Ocean. Together, the states comprise around 607 islands that cover a longitudinal distance of almost 2,700 km (1,678 mi) just north of the equator. They lie northeast of New Guinea, south of Guam and the Marianas, west of Nauru and the Marshall Islands, east of Palau and the Philippines, about 2,900 km (1,802 mi) north of eastern Australia and some 4,000 km (2,485 mi) southwest of the main islands of Hawaii.

The mountain was listed on the United States National Register of Historic Places on September 30, 1976, [2] a time when Chuuk was part of the US-administered Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands United Nations trust territory in the western Pacific administered by the United States from 1947 to 1986

The Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (TTPI) was a United Nations trust territory in Micronesia administered by the United States from 1947 to 1994.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in the Federated States of Micronesia Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the buildings, sites, districts, and objects listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the Federated States of Micronesia. There are currently 26 listed sites located in all 4 states of the Federated States of Micronesia.

Related Research Articles

This article is about communications systems in the Federated States of Micronesia.

Chuuk Lagoon A sheltered body of water in the central Pacific in the Federated States of Micronesia

Chuuk Lagoon, also previously known as Truk Lagoon, is a sheltered body of water in the central Pacific. About 1,800 kilometres north-east of New Guinea, it is located mid-ocean at 7 degrees North latitude, and is part of Chuuk State within the Federated States of Micronesia. The atoll consists of a protective reef, 225 kilometres (140 mi) around, enclosing a natural harbour 79 by 50 kilometres, with an area of 2,130 square kilometres. It has a land area of 93.07 square kilometres, with a population of 36,158 people and a maximal height of 443 m. Weno city on Moen Island functions as the atoll's capital and also as the state capital and is the largest city in the FSM with its 13,700 people.

Chuukese, also rendered Trukese, is a Trukic language of the Austronesian language family spoken primarily on the islands of Chuuk in the Caroline Islands in Micronesia. There are communities of speakers on Pohnpei, Guam, and the Hawai'ian Islands as well. Estimates show that there are about 45,900 speakers in Micronesia.

Xavier High School, Micronesia

Xavier High School is a Jesuit coeducational high school located on the island of Weno in Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia. It was established in 1952. It was the first high school in the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. Bishop Thomas Feeney, S.J., D.D. from the New York Province of the Society of Jesus originally envisioned a minor seminary to train local clergy. Soon after, Xavier Seminary became the first college preparatory school in the Western Pacific.

Micronesian Americans are Americans who are descended from people of the Federated States of Micronesia. According to the 2010 census, a total of 8,185 residents self-identified as having origins in the country, which consists of four states. More than half of these residents identified their origin as Chuuk State (4,211) with the rest as follows: 2,060 people from Pohnpei, 1,018 from Yap, and 906 people from Kosrae.

Losap

Note: this article is not about a Length of Service Award Program, also known as a LOSAP. That article can be found here: Length of service award program.

Japanese settlement in what now constitutes modern-day Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) dates back to the end of the 19th century, when Japanese traders and explorers settled on the central and eastern Carolines, although earlier contacts can not be completely excluded. After the islands were occupied by Japan in 1914, a large-scale Japanese immigration to them took place in the 1920s and 1930s. The Japanese government encouraged immigration to the islands belonging to the South Pacific Mandate to offset demographic and economic problems facing Japan at that time.

Mori Koben was a Japanese businessman and adventurer, who was best remembered as one of the first Japanese pioneers in Micronesia. As a young man, Mori migrated from Japan to Chuuk, where he helped to establish Japanese businesses in Micronesia. Mori's guidance and direction helped to expand Japanese business interests throughout Micronesia during the Spanish and German colonial-era. After Japan annexed Micronesia from Germany in 1914, Mori was hired as an adviser to the Japanese administration in the South Pacific Mandate, and was instrumental in encouraging Japanese settlement in Micronesia. In his final years during World War II, Mori facilitated Micronesian support in the Japanese war efforts, but was already suffering from failing health from old age. He died within a few days after the Japanese surrender, and a sizeable minority of Micronesians with Japanese ancestry from Chuuk trace their ancestry back to Mori.

Catholic Belltower

The Catholic Belltower is a historic tower at the Catholic Mission in Kolonia, on the island of Pohnpei in the Federated States of Micronesia. The belltower and adjoining masonry apse are all that remain of a church built in 1909 by German Capuchin missionaries, when Ponape and the other Caroline Islands were administered as part of German New Guinea. The rest of the church was destroyed during the fighting of World War II. The tower is 4.8 metres (16 ft) square, rising to a height of 20.7 metres (68 ft), and the shell of the apse is about 10 metres (33 ft) in height. The tower has a foundation of basalt rock and lime mortar, and is constructed out of concrete bricks.

Wiichen Mens Meetinghouse

The Wiichen Men's Meetinghouse is a historic building site in Peniesene on Moen Island in Chuuk State of the Federated States of Micronesia. The site, deemed archaeologically significant due to its place in Chuukese folklore, includes a pre-contact period petroglyph panel and swimming basin. Local history claims that this was the meeting place of six brothers who became the first chieftains of Chuuk.

Japanese Lighthouse (Poluwat, Chuuk) historic lighthouse in Poluwat, Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia

The Japanese Lighthouse, or Poluwat Lighthouse, is an abandoned lighthouse situated on Alet Island in Poluwat, Chuuk in the Federated States of Micronesia. It was completed in 1940 by the Japanese and was in use until being attacked by U.S. forces in World War II. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. The lighthouse is a good example of pre-World War II "marine architecture" built by the Japanese.

Japanese Army Headquarters (Tonowas) historic military structure in Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia

The World War II Japanese Army Headquarters for the defense of Tonowas, an island in what is now Chuuk State in the Federated States of Micronesia, was located in an underground bunker in the village of Roro. The underground facilities, including an office, communications center, print shop, supply room, and health clinic, were built in response to American air raids against the facilities, which were associated with the major naval facility of the Imperial Japanese Navy in Chuuk Lagoon.

Spanish Fort (Yap)

The Spanish Fort in Colonia, the capital of Yap State in the Federated States of Micronesia, is a historic seat of power on the island of Yap. Only foundational remnants of the 19th-century Spanish fortification survive, on a property now occupied by the local government. The site was also where German and Japanese administrators had their headquarters during their respective periods of administration in the decades of the 20th century before World War II. The foundation was built of stone and cement, and is still accessible via its original steps.

Tonotan Guns and Caves

The Tonotan Guns and Caves are a series of World War II-era military fortification on the island of Weno, the main island of Chuuk State in the Federated States of Micronesia. They consist of an excavation housing an English naval gun, and a series of caves used for housing and operations that provided shelter from aerial bombardment. The installations are located on the lower north flank of Mount Teroken, the island's highest peak.

The Fauba Archaeological Site is a prehistoric stoneworks on a mountain ridge on Tol Island in Chuuk State of the Federated States of Micronesia. The site consists of an area enclosed by a stone wall that is roughly triangular in shape. The wall is between 1 and 1.5 meters in height, and is about 1 meter thick. The enclosed area includes a number of stone platforms, and there is a refuse midden outside the enclosure that is believed to be associated with the site. The exact purpose of the site is a subject of debate: although its siting has obvious military benefits (including commanding views of Chuuk Lagoon and other islands of the atoll, it is not clear that it actually saw military activity.

Japanese Artillery Road and Pohndolap Area

The Japanese Artillery Road and Pohndolap Area are a historic area on Sokehs Island in the Federated States of Micronesia. Sokehs has a prominent north-south ridge (known locally as "Pohndolap", overlooking the state capital Kolonia, and was fortified by the Japanese during World War II. They built a road to the summit area and emplaced anti-aircraft guns on the ridge. The ridge was also a key site in the 1910 Sokehs Rebellion against Japanese rule, and the remnants of a Pohnpeian fort are also in the area. The surviving elements of these fortifications were listed on the United States National Register of Historic Places in 1976. The old road is now part of a hiking trail, leading up to the fortifications.

References