Tony Bova

Last updated
Tony Bova
Born:(1917-08-21)August 21, 1917
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US
Died:October 15, 1973(1973-10-15) (aged 56)
Career information
Position(s) End, Halfback
College Saint Francis University
Career history
As player
1942 Pittsburgh Steelers
1943"Steagles"
1944 Card-Pitt
19451947Pittsburgh Steelers

Tony Bova (born Anthony J. Bova) (August 21, 1917  October 15, 1973) [1] was a professional football player for the Pittsburgh Steelers during the 1940s. He graduated from The Kiski School and then Saint Francis University, located in Loretto, Pennsylvania, in 1943. [2] He was 6'1" and weighed 190 pounds when he played for the Steelers during World War II, when they temporarily merged with the Philadelphia Eagles (in 1943) and Chicago Cardinals (in 1944) to form the "Steagles" and "Card-Pitt". He played end, halfback, and quarterback during his career from 1942 to 1947. [3] In 1942 he also played left end on defense and in 1947 scored a safety. [4] In 1943 Bova led the NFL in average gain per completed pass in 1943, netting 419 yards in 19 completed aerials. [5] [6] In 1942 he wore numbers 31 and 41 and in 1943 number 85. [7]

He was also blind in one eye and partially blind in the other. [8] He joined the United States Navy during World War II and reported for duty in February 1943 as a Seabee. [9] He was soon discharged from the navy due to his vision. [10]

Bova is also listed on the NFL honor roll, located at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, which lists the over 1,000 NFL personnel who served in the military during World War II. [11]

He is buried in the Mt. Royal Cemetery in Glenshaw, Pennsylvania. [1]

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Anthony J. Bova obituary". Beaver County Times. October 16, 1973. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  2. 2005 Saint Francis University Alumni Directory, p. 307.
  3. http://static.steelers.com/mediacontent/2009/08/24/06/All_Time_Roster_Name_09_108697.pdf
  4. https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/B/BovaTo20.htm
  5. Dedman, Gordon. "1947 Pittsburgh Steelers". Steelers UK. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  6. http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/eagles_files/html/1940-1949_4.html
  7. http://www.steelers.com/article/40479
  8. maryrose (September 17, 2008). "Steagles: When the Steelers and Eagles were One in [sic] the Same". SB Nation: Behind the Steel Curtain. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  9. Sell, Jack. "Stars Serving Uncle Sam", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette , February 18, 1943, page 15. Retrieved August 27, 2020.
  10. "Tony Bova", Saint Francis University Athletics Hall of Fame. Retrieved August 27, 2020.
  11. "Football and America: WW II Honor Roll". Pro Football Hall of Fame. January 1, 2005. Retrieved January 31, 2018.

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