Tony Brottem

Last updated
Tony Brottem
Catcher / First baseman
Born:(1891-04-30)April 30, 1891
Halstad, Minnesota
Died: August 5, 1929(1929-08-05) (aged 38)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 17, 1916, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1921, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
MLB statistics
Batting average .215
Home runs 0
Runs batted in 13
Teams

Anton Christian "Tony" Brottem (April 30, 1891 – August 5, 1929) was a Major League Baseball player. He played with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1916 and 1918 and the Washington Senators and the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1921.

Brottem played as an infielder and a catcher; he batted and threw right-handed. He committed suicide by slashing his throat on August 5, 1929 in Chicago, Illinois. [1] The coroner was able to identify the deceased as Brottem with the assistance of umpire Charley Moran. [2]

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References

  1. "Baseball player suicides". Portsmouth Daily Times. Associated Press. 7 August 1929. p. 13. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
  2. "Tony Brottem, Catcher, Takes Own Life". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 17 August 1929. p. 7. Retrieved 4 November 2020.