Tony Clarke (singer)

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Tony Clarke
Tony Clarke.png
Background information
Birth nameRalph Thomas Williams
Born(1940-04-13)April 13, 1940
New York City, U.S.
DiedAugust 28, 1971(1971-08-28) (aged 31)
Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
Genres Soul
Occupation(s)Musician, singer, songwriter
InstrumentsVocals
Years active1960s–1971
Labels Chess

Tony Clarke (April 13, 1940 – August 28, 1971) was an American soul singer and songwriter.

Contents

Early life and career

Clarke, thought to have been born Ralph Thomas Williams in New York City, was raised in Detroit. He performed as a singer and made his first recordings for the small Stepp label in the late 1950s. He wrote the songs "Pushover" and "Two Sides to Every Story", hits for Etta James, with Billy Davis. [1]

Clarke had his first chart entry in 1964 with "(The Story of) Woman, Love and a Man", which reached No. 88 on the R&B chart. He had more success with his own song, "The Entertainer", which hit No. 10 R&B and No. 31 Pop in the U.S. in 1965. In 1966, he moved from Detroit to Hollywood, and secured a small part in the film They Call Me Mister Tibbs! . [2]

He was fatally shot by his estranged wife when he broke into her house in Detroit. After his death, his career saw a resurgence in the 1970s on the United Kingdom's Northern soul scene particularly with his recording of "Landslide". [2]

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References

Tony Clarke at Find a Grave