Tony Collins

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Tony Collins may refer to:

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The surname Collins has a variety of likely origins in Britain and Ireland:

  1. Anglo-Saxon and Scottish: A patronymic surname based on the English and Scottish name Colin, an English diminutive form of Nicholas.
  2. Norse: From the Old Norse personal name "Kollungr" a form of "koli" which in Old English became 'Cola', meaning swarthy or dark.
  3. Irish: The medieval surname was Ua Cuiléin, which has usually become Ó Coileáin today.
  4. Welsh: Collen; hazel, hazel grove.

Justin is a masculine given name of Latin origin. It is the anglicized form of the Latin given name Justinus, a derivative of Justus, meaning "just", "fair", or "righteous". Justinus was the name borne by various early saints, notably a 2nd-century Christian apologist and a boy martyr of the 3rd century. The name is also related to the similar Latin name Justinian. As an English name, Justin is common particularly in the English-speaking world starting in the latter half of the 20th century.

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